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  • Advice On How To Be A Good Writer

    Hey everybody. I need some advice on how to be a good writer, I have been so much fictional stories on tarot. My stories are very good and I'm thinking of writing a Dungeons and Dragons fan fiction story about a group of Drow heroes (Male fighter, female cleric, male rogue and female wizard.) The four heroes will face a powerful male half-fiend elf fighter. So I need some advice on how can I pull it off this epic story. Any pointers anybody?
    I'M RICH! MITCH!

  • #2
    Just write. Write a thousand words per day, every day.
    And study some grammar books.
    😈 "It's too bad that stupidity isn't painful." Anton LaVey 😈

    Comment


    • #3
      What Cassie said. Write. Rewrite. Write some more. Keep writing, and writing and writing, until you can't write anymore, then write again.

      Get Beta Readers to critique your work. Talk to other writers too. Go back to writing.

      Practice makes perfect.

      Rome wasn't built in a day. You *have* to keep going, and listen to those who have been doing it for years. Watch out for asshole writers who think they know it all but don't know squat. Pay attention to the authors who have garnered awesome reviews and sales.

      Take it from someone who had been there did that, and finally got her first publishing contract after working on *one* story for five whole years.
      "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." - Stephen King.


      "If a book has my name on it, I wrote it. Every word of it." ~Nora Roberts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Cloaked Raven View Post
        What Cassie said. Write. Rewrite. Write some more. Keep writing, and writing and writing, until you can't write anymore, then write again.

        Get Beta Readers to critique your work. Talk to other writers too. Go back to writing.

        Practice makes perfect.

        Rome wasn't built in a day. You *have* to keep going, and listen to those who have been doing it for years. Watch out for asshole writers who think they know it all but don't know squat. Pay attention to the authors who have garnered awesome reviews and sales.

        Take it from someone who had been there did that, and finally got her first publishing contract after working on *one* story for five whole years.
        I did. I wrote an adult version of D&D in another forum and one person hate my adult version story. She said I should take writing courses.
        I'M RICH! MITCH!

        Comment


        • #5
          Just because one person hated it doesn't mean it's "trash". Writing courses are a great idea if you are just starting out. There are some great online ones that are free too.

          Get someone else to read it. In the meantime, write something else. A subject you're ultra familiar with. The best way to improve your writing is practice.

          Do writing exercises. Writing prompts from others is a good way to practice and strengthen your writing muscles.

          Don't think you're going to get it perfect in draft one. Write it. Edit it. Set it aside, write something else, then go back to the first draft. Edit it again. Beta readers. More edits and revisions. It can take upwards of a year to get anything decent enough to show beta readers, especially if you're a newbie to writing.

          Sometimes an entire rewrite is necessary. Been there, did that. Doing another one after I'm finished the draft of the current WIP, unless another idea grabs me first.

          Never think that you have a best seller on your hands even in twentieth draft, or if you've had 20 best selling works in the past.

          Take your time. Don't rush it. None of us are Stephen King or Nora Roberts. If you rush things, you could miss a lot of stuff.

          Find a writing community group in Facebook if you have it, or a writing forum. There are several good ones out there. Just do a search on Google, and you'll find at least one. Some are for all writers, some are just for certain genres.

          Good luck!
          "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." - Stephen King.


          "If a book has my name on it, I wrote it. Every word of it." ~Nora Roberts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Cloaked Raven View Post
            Just because one person hated it doesn't mean it's "trash". Writing courses are a great idea if you are just starting out. There are some great online ones that are free too.

            Get someone else to read it. In the meantime, write something else. A subject you're ultra familiar with. The best way to improve your writing is practice.

            Do writing exercises. Writing prompts from others is a good way to practice and strengthen your writing muscles.

            Don't think you're going to get it perfect in draft one. Write it. Edit it. Set it aside, write something else, then go back to the first draft. Edit it again. Beta readers. More edits and revisions. It can take upwards of a year to get anything decent enough to show beta readers, especially if you're a newbie to writing.

            Sometimes an entire rewrite is necessary. Been there, did that. Doing another one after I'm finished the draft of the current WIP, unless another idea grabs me first.

            Never think that you have a best seller on your hands even in twentieth draft, or if you've had 20 best selling works in the past.

            Take your time. Don't rush it. None of us are Stephen King or Nora Roberts. If you rush things, you could miss a lot of stuff.

            Find a writing community group in Facebook if you have it, or a writing forum. There are several good ones out there. Just do a search on Google, and you'll find at least one. Some are for all writers, some are just for certain genres.

            Good luck!
            Thanks for the advice, Cloaked Raven. And you're about one thing, I may not be Stephen King but at least I'll try to be one.
            I'M RICH! MITCH!

            Comment


            • #7
              I. Firstly, set up a space from which to write. don't become dependent on being in this space in order to write but be mindful that the proper atmosphere is condusive to writing and use this to your advantage.
              Take note of where you are when writing comes easily and incorporate what you can of that moment into your writing space.

              II. if you are writing as opposed to typing, do not use a pen unless it is an ink quil pen. Pencils are better than ball points and quils are even better than pencils. They will help you collect and express your thoughts.
              They have you take note of what you are writing. use other writing materials only when you need to keep up with your thoughts, then go back and refine. Cultivate an awareness of how your writing is expressed with different utensils .

              III. Vocabulary, have it and use it. avoid repeating the same words over and over unless they are being emphasized as a crucial part of the understanding conveyed.

              IV. Know the right vocabulary for your audience. have an idea of who you are addressing and how best to convey to them what you are saying.

              V. Don't try to be Stephen King. Be you and write for your own reasons. Don't try to emulate someone else to become successful. That comes at the cost of your art. You asked how to become a good writer, not a popular one. it is better to find the right audience than it is to cater to the world at large. Fads come and go, people are impatient and have short attention spans. The right niche has staying power. You might have more than one niche, none of them having anything to do with one another however, the niche is still there for each of them. Truthfully, must people do not read and have shitty taste so do not be discouraged if your stuff isn't popular. Those who do read will help you communicate better so that they can pick your brain.

              VI. Surround yourself with authors and others who are intellectually productive. Cultivate good habits and while you are doing your own thing, be part of the crossroads or intersection of the paths that are putting forth the work.

              VII. See if those people have a writers group. Not all writers groups are created equal. Find one with people whose habits you wish to adopt. People who inspire you to get stuff done.
              Groups that come together to write and discuss writing will get you practicing. It does not matter if all you come up with is shit, your engaging in writing and learning to write under pressure and deadline.
              That means you are learning to be more productive even if you don't see yourself being productive.


              VIII. Don't throw anything out if you genuinely like the concept or think it could be great if you felt you didn't suck so much. It is creative insight and you can do something with it later once you are able to look back and see the cliches you've been using. Also, if you are going to use them, learn how to them playfully and go back. As you become able to more deeply understand and explore themes, archetypes and setting, you'll be able to revise your old stuff and give it a polished shine.

              I did. I wrote an adult version of D&D in another forum and one person hate my adult version story. She said I should take writing courses.
              Right, she didn't say don't bother. So maybe she thinks there is something worth writing about there but that there are skills you need to learn in order to yield fruit.
              A tomato is not a bad tomato just because it isn't ripe, it is still a work in progress.
              Last edited by Humming Bird; December 30th, 2016, 09:25 PM.
              Tsalagi Nvwoti Didahnvwesgi Ale Didahnesesgi
              (Cherokee medicine practitioner of left and right hand paths)
              anikutani.stfu-kthx.net - The Anikutani Tradition

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DracoJesi View Post
                I. Firstly, set up a space from which to write. don't become dependent on being in this space in order to write but be mindful that the proper atmosphere is condusive to writing and use this to your advantage.
                Take note of where you are when writing comes easily and incorporate what you can of that moment into your writing space.

                II. if you are writing as opposed to typing, do not use a pen unless it is an ink quil pen. Pencils are better than ball points and quils are even better than pencils. They will help you collect and express your thoughts.
                They have you take note of what you are writing. use other writing materials only when you need to keep up with your thoughts, then go back and refine. Cultivate an awareness of how your writing is expressed with different utensils .

                III. Vocabulary, have it and use it. avoid repeating the same words over and over unless they are being emphasized as a crucial part of the understanding conveyed.

                IV. Know the right vocabulary for your audience. have an idea of who you are addressing and how best to convey to them what you are saying.

                V. Don't try to be Stephen King. Be you and write for your own reasons. Don't try to emulate someone else to become successful. That comes at the cost of your art. You asked how to become a good writer, not a popular one. it is better to find the right audience than it is to cater to the world at large. Fads come and go, people are impatient and have short attention spans. The right niche has staying power. You might have more than one niche, none of them having anything to do with one another however, the niche is still there for each of them. Truthfully, must people do not read and have shitty taste so do not be discouraged if your stuff isn't popular. Those who do read will help you communicate better so that they can pick your brain.

                VI. Surround yourself with authors and others who are intellectually productive. Cultivate good habits and while you are doing your own thing, be part of the crossroads or intersection of the paths that are putting forth the work.

                VII. See if those people have a writers group. Not all writers groups are created equal. Find one with people whose habits you wish to adopt. People who inspire you to get stuff done.
                Groups that come together to write and discuss writing will get you practicing. It does not matter if all you come up with is shit, your engaging in writing and learning to write under pressure and deadline.
                That means you are learning to be more productive even if you don't see yourself being productive.


                VIII. Don't throw anything out if you genuinely like the concept or think it could be great if you felt you didn't suck so much. It is creative insight and you can do something with it later once you are able to look back and see the cliches you've been using. Also, if you are going to use them, learn how to them playfully and go back. As you become able to more deeply understand and explore themes, archetypes and setting, you'll be able to revise your old stuff and give it a polished shine.



                Right, she didn't say don't bother. So maybe she thinks there is something worth writing about there but that there are skills you need to learn in order to yield fruit.
                A tomato is not a bad tomato just because it isn't ripe, it is still a work in progress.
                Those are great advice. I'll put it to great use. Thank you
                I'M RICH! MITCH!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DracoJesi View Post
                  I. Firstly, set up a space from which to write. don't become dependent on being in this space in order to write but be mindful that the proper atmosphere is condusive to writing and use this to your advantage.
                  Take note of where you are when writing comes easily and incorporate what you can of that moment into your writing space.

                  II. if you are writing as opposed to typing, do not use a pen unless it is an ink quil pen. Pencils are better than ball points and quils are even better than pencils. They will help you collect and express your thoughts.
                  They have you take note of what you are writing. use other writing materials only when you need to keep up with your thoughts, then go back and refine. Cultivate an awareness of how your writing is expressed with different utensils .

                  III. Vocabulary, have it and use it. avoid repeating the same words over and over unless they are being emphasized as a crucial part of the understanding conveyed.

                  IV. Know the right vocabulary for your audience. have an idea of who you are addressing and how best to convey to them what you are saying.

                  V. Don't try to be Stephen King. Be you and write for your own reasons. Don't try to emulate someone else to become successful. That comes at the cost of your art. You asked how to become a good writer, not a popular one. it is better to find the right audience than it is to cater to the world at large. Fads come and go, people are impatient and have short attention spans. The right niche has staying power. You might have more than one niche, none of them having anything to do with one another however, the niche is still there for each of them. Truthfully, must people do not read and have shitty taste so do not be discouraged if your stuff isn't popular. Those who do read will help you communicate better so that they can pick your brain.

                  VI. Surround yourself with authors and others who are intellectually productive. Cultivate good habits and while you are doing your own thing, be part of the crossroads or intersection of the paths that are putting forth the work.

                  VII. See if those people have a writers group. Not all writers groups are created equal. Find one with people whose habits you wish to adopt. People who inspire you to get stuff done.
                  Groups that come together to write and discuss writing will get you practicing. It does not matter if all you come up with is shit, your engaging in writing and learning to write under pressure and deadline.
                  That means you are learning to be more productive even if you don't see yourself being productive.


                  VIII. Don't throw anything out if you genuinely like the concept or think it could be great if you felt you didn't suck so much. It is creative insight and you can do something with it later once you are able to look back and see the cliches you've been using. Also, if you are going to use them, learn how to them playfully and go back. As you become able to more deeply understand and explore themes, archetypes and setting, you'll be able to revise your old stuff and give it a polished shine.



                  Right, she didn't say don't bother. So maybe she thinks there is something worth writing about there but that there are skills you need to learn in order to yield fruit.
                  A tomato is not a bad tomato just because it isn't ripe, it is still a work in progress.
                  Beautiful advice, DracoJesi! You are dead on with all of that.

                  Bartman, I mean it... Join a writing forum. You'd be surprised just how much you will learn in the first day alone. I had one of the best editors in the business - not just my genre - suggest I join one and I am so glad I did... I learned more in two days than I had in the previous three years.

                  I will say this too... Never think you know it all about writing, even after you've finished 20 novels and have a zillion awards. I know a few best selling authors that ask for ideas from us newbies and it was kind of a shock to see it from my viewpoint.

                  Always, *ALWAYS* let someone read your work after you're done writing the first draft, preferably someone who doesn't know you, but knows the genre. Any newbie who doesn't show their work to someone else outside of their best friend for fear of "someone stealing it" is an a**hole writer.

                  If you can't take any criticism, bad included with the good, you're not a real writer, you're an a**hole writer, a fake, a wannabe. Real writers take all forms of criticism, and use the not so good stuff to learn from and improve their writing. Wannabes sit and whine or gripe about people not liking their stuff.

                  Just keep going. Practice, practice, practice.

                  If I think of anything else, I'll let you know. Of course, don't forget I'm still learning myself... That's why I stress *join a writing forum!!!*.

                  All the best Bartman. You've got this!
                  "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." - Stephen King.


                  "If a book has my name on it, I wrote it. Every word of it." ~Nora Roberts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm also going to write a Yu-Gi-Oh fan fiction story and a poker story as well.
                    I'M RICH! MITCH!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good luck! The more you write, the easier it gets.
                      "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." - Stephen King.


                      "If a book has my name on it, I wrote it. Every word of it." ~Nora Roberts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks. Last night I post my Yu-Gi-Oh Fan Fiction story on a Yu-Gi-Oh theme forum and I'm waiting for feedback.
                        I'M RICH! MITCH!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bartmanhomer View Post
                          Thanks. Last night I post my Yu-Gi-Oh Fan Fiction story on a Yu-Gi-Oh theme forum and I'm waiting for feedback.
                          Awesome. Just remember to listen carefully to any advice and critiques you get. Some may not like it, so be prepared, but if they say why, listen to them. Part of writing and putting your stuff out there means having a thick skin. Hearing people say they didn't like your work is common in this business, just like rejections. You have to take the bad with the good, and learn from it.

                          Part of the journey is learning what works and what doesn't, as well as finding your own style.
                          "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." - Stephen King.


                          "If a book has my name on it, I wrote it. Every word of it." ~Nora Roberts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Cloaky, which writing forums do you like?

                            Bartman, good luck with your writing.
                            Another beautiful day in the state of denial.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DreamaLittle View Post
                              Cloaky, which writing forums do you like?

                              Bartman, good luck with your writing.
                              Messaged you! :boing:

                              I'm in two currently, both were recommended to me by one of the top editors in the entire publishing business. I had submitted a not so polished story to her in 2014, and she loved my writing even if she couldn't offer me a contract at the time. In turn, she gave me tons of advice on how to write, as well as what forums are the best for an aspiring author. Those two were the top ones on her list.

                              I will thank her to my dying day for doing that. She saved me from making a lot of critical errors. I had considered publishing that story "as is", which would have really messed up my career. To self publish, the story *HAS* to be *PERFECT* - not just in editing, etc, but perfect in the fact it's a great story. It can't be clumsily written, have grammatical errors, or passive and repetitive things. It has to be so glossy it outshines the sun when you publish it or it's a huge flop before you even hit "publish".

                              That story was nowhere near ready. Had I published it then, it would have flopped, and my career would have been over.

                              I'm glad I was smart and followed what that editor said instead of some wannabes that were trying to convince me to listen to them *only*, and not join a forum or talk to *real* writers and authors. I guess they knew I'd tell them where to "shove" their advice once I knew the truth. It was nothing but sabotage in my opinion. They knew I only needed a little practice and advice to get my career started, while their work isn't good enough to paper an outhouse in a lot of people's minds (People told me about how much they thought so and so's work wasn't good at all, or needed tons of help, their published draft looked like one of my first drafts). Their stuff needs more work in the "final" draft than mine does in the first draft... Just saying!

                              Yeah another piece of advice, don't listen to anyone that sounds like they know it all. Talk to a LOT of others out there, writers and readers alike. Don't just listen to me, listen to everyone who takes the time and gives you a professional round of constructive criticism. If someone asks you to leave stuff out because it's not their thing, TOSS THEM, FAST! They're not professional and you don't need to worry about that kind of thing!!!

                              Shutting my big yap now! :bigredgri
                              "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." - Stephen King.


                              "If a book has my name on it, I wrote it. Every word of it." ~Nora Roberts.

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