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  • Phyllis Curott

    Merry Meet!

    My favorite Pagan author is Phyllis Curott. I stumbled on her book one day when I was a very fluffy Wiccan. I was looking for a printed book of shadows with spells and rituals and what not, when I had to leave in a rush because the person I was shopping with was tired of waiting so I grabbed Book of Shadows by Phyllis Curott. I opened the book up at home and I was a bit taken aback that it was a story and not a book of shadows.

    I read the first page, and afterwards I could not put the book down. Her talented writing painted a vivid picture for you. I loved the book, I finished it in a few days and I have read it several more times. Although Phyllis can be a bit fluffy at times, her book was a portal for me to mature in Wicca.

    I have also read and enjoyed her newest release, Witchcrafting. This is an informative book with lots of good information. I just wanted to see what other people thought of her.

    Merry Part!
    Haze Oak

  • #2
    She's OK, although I have to say that the 'history' in 'Book of Shadows' has pretty much poisoned me opinions of her....anyone who could seriously state that 'they burned all the drums' and 'no non-religious music was allowed' during the so-called "burning times" will forever after have very little credibility in my view...
    That whole protesting the movie 'The Craft' made her look pretty damn silly, too, now that I think of it.

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    • #3
      If you scroll way down to the bottom of the page to the list of Similar Threads you will see there are 2 or 3 others with reviews of her books.
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      • #4
        I have both 'Book of Shadows' and 'Witchcrafting' though I haven't picked them up to read in a while. I did prefer Witchcrafting over Book of Shadows though.


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        That's the thing about magic. There's always consequences. Always.

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        • #5
          I noticed the other day that she's come out with a brand new one...let me see if I can find the title...Ah yes, here it is: The Love Spell: An Erotic Memoir Of Spiritual Awakening

          Here's a link on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

          Looks sort of interesting, but I believe I'll wait for the paperback.

          I do have her first two books, though, and I enjoyed them both.
          "Witches do not kiss the Devil's posterior, first because they do not kiss anyone's posterior and, secondly, because the Devil is never there for anyone to kiss." - Gerald Gardner

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          • #6
            Originally posted by HazeOak
            I grabbed Book of Shadows by Phyllis Curott. I opened the book up at home and I was a bit taken aback that it was a story and not a book of shadows.

            I read the first page, and afterwards I could not put the book down. Her talented writing painted a vivid picture for you. I loved the book, I finished it in a few days and I have read it several more times. Although Phyllis can be a bit fluffy at times, her book was a portal for me to mature in Wicca.
            I enjoyed that book also. I had been loking for something that would offer a personal account of moving from the traditional Western world into a life of magical or pagan practice, and Curott's "Book of Shadows" fit the bill.

            I thought it may be a good gift in the future to various women in my family, to more gently introduce the idea of Wicca to them -- not for their own study, but to promote greater understanding and less prejudice. (I don't think the boys would be all that interested in it. )

            Last edited by novena; December 30th, 2004, 09:15 PM. Reason: typo
            -- novena

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            • #7
              she is interesting although I read a review that pointed out something slightly disturbing about one of her spells. It is called the tears of Poisideon. It is supposed to be for emotional cleansing. You are supposed to go and get about a cup sea salt and pour it in the ocean while releasing your more sorrowful emotions. Of course not everyone is near the ocean so she suggests doing the same thing in a spring or brooke which could harm the ecosystem and kill fish. I don't remember too much of the book so I cant varify for sure but if it is true how can she be so connected to the earth? Other than that though she does have an interesting and sometimes refreshing approach to wicca.
              ___________________________________________________



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              • #8
                Originally posted by HazeOak
                My favorite Pagan author is Phyllis Curott....I just wanted to see what other people thought of her.

                Merry Part!
                Haze Oak
                Personally, I've never been impressed and find her books to be mediocre at best. But then again I was turned off on how she became "famous" in the community, and so I have a negative filter at work. Upon writing her first book, Curott reportedly took a huge sum of money from her Trust Fund and hired a publicity agency, which resulted in a national blitz of TV appearances and newspaper articles. This made her "famous" overnight. Before this she was virtually unknown in the community at large. I prefer "celebrities" who first earn their reputation and acceptance from hard work in the community. But to be fair, she has since pitched in and certainly become a force for good in the community.

                In Her service,
                Nemesis Descending

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                • #9
                  About the salt: a cup of salt in a fair amount of water does very little to change the salinity of the water. (I use a half cup of sea salt in the bathtub once or twice a week: where do you think that water goes but eventually back into the lakes and rivers, since I live in the Midwest US?) This is especially true in free-flowing streams or rivers: lots of water goes by and anything dilutes fast unless it's in serious quantities.

                  If you are really concerned about the effect on the environment, there's all sorts of alternatives, from using a different substance, to using much less (a pinch or three, perhaps.) She does make it reasonably clear that you need to do stuff that's effective and meaningful for you, so it's not like she's arguing you need to do it exactly her way (as some authors have.)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WhiteRavenBran
                    I noticed the other day that she's come out with a brand new one...let me see if I can find the title...Ah yes, here it is: The Love Spell: An Erotic Memoir Of Spiritual Awakening

                    Here's a link on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

                    Looks sort of interesting, but I believe I'll wait for the paperback.

                    I do have her first two books, though, and I enjoyed them both.
                    Oh my. I don't know if I really want to read about Phyllis gettin' it on. After all, I know both her and her ex-husband personally. That'd be a little... weird.
                    Ben Trismegistus
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                    • #11
                      About the salt: a cup of salt in a fair amount of water does very little to change the salinity of the water. (I use a half cup of sea salt in the bathtub once or twice a week: where do you think that water goes but eventually back into the lakes and rivers, since I live in the Midwest US?) This is especially true in free-flowing streams or rivers: lots of water goes by and anything dilutes fast unless it's in serious quantities.

                      If you are really concerned about the effect on the environment, there's all sorts of alternatives, from using a different substance, to using much less (a pinch or three, perhaps.) She does make it reasonably clear that you need to do stuff that's effective and meaningful for you, so it's not like she's arguing you need to do it exactly her way (as some authors have.)

                      Well of course it doesn't matter if there is a fair amount of water, all I am saying is that there might be potential where there isn't a fair amount of water. I read the complaint in a review in new witch magazine and it just made me think. I personally don't mind this since i live near the ocean. and obviously sea salt wont hurt it but I am not interested in doing the ritual anyway. All I am saying is that the spell can have potentially have bad side effects. As far as doing your own thing goes; personally I never follow a spell word for word even if I adore the author but some people especially beginners are a little insecure when starting out. They may be worried that they are doing something wrong so they may follow it like a recipe.
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Nemesis Descending
                        Personally, I've never been impressed and find her books to be mediocre at best. But then again I was turned off on how she became "famous" in the community, and so I have a negative filter at work. Upon writing her first book, Curott reportedly took a huge sum of money from her Trust Fund and hired a publicity agency, which resulted in a national blitz of TV appearances and newspaper articles. This made her "famous" overnight. Before this she was virtually unknown in the community at large. I prefer "celebrities" who first earn their reputation and acceptance from hard work in the community. But to be fair, she has since pitched in and certainly become a force for good in the community.

                        In Her service,
                        Nemesis Descending
                        I don't know that that is a fair assessment. She was well known in the Northeastern and national Pagan communities for many years before writing a book. She is a past president of COG and a major community organizer. There are many ways to become famous and she was famous on her merits locally.

                        You can fault authors for getting overnight fame because any schmo can write a book while members of a community with solid reputations for good work who DON'T write books don't get to see their names on shelves.

                        There are Pagan authors who have been active and reputable in the community for years prior to publishing or concurrent with publishing. Local activity, national activity in things like COG, writing in Pagan newsletters (in the past) and websites (nowadays) and maujor magazines like Green Egg or Sagewoman, presenting at festivals, these are all solid ways of building a reputation that have nothing to do with book publishing.

                        Phyllis was active and known before she wrote Book of Shadows. My understanding of the PR blitz was that she wanted to reach out to the non-Pagan community for educational purposes. She used her financial assets to learn, through a publicity consultant, how best to present herself and Wicca to the general public. She then spoke at festivals, sharing that knowledge with the community at large.
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HazeOak
                          Merry Meet!

                          My favorite Pagan author is Phyllis Curott. I stumbled on her book one day when I was a very fluffy Wiccan. I was looking for a printed book of shadows with spells and rituals and what not, when I had to leave in a rush because the person I was shopping with was tired of waiting so I grabbed Book of Shadows by Phyllis Curott. I opened the book up at home and I was a bit taken aback that it was a story and not a book of shadows.

                          I read the first page, and afterwards I could not put the book down. Her talented writing painted a vivid picture for you. I loved the book, I finished it in a few days and I have read it several more times. Although Phyllis can be a bit fluffy at times, her book was a portal for me to mature in Wicca.

                          I have also read and enjoyed her newest release, Witchcrafting. This is an informative book with lots of good information. I just wanted to see what other people thought of her.

                          Merry Part!
                          Haze Oak
                          The same thing happened with me.
                          sigpic
                          Thanks Catiana!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DebLipp
                            I don't know that that is a fair assessment. She was well known in the Northeastern and national Pagan communities for many years before writing a book. She is a past president of COG and a major community organizer. There are many ways to become famous and she was famous on her merits locally.
                            Well, I'll grant that she was known, perhaps even well-known, in her own local community. But "famous" - um.....I'd question that assessment. And COG, well, my understanding is that there are less than 300 people in the organization Nationwide. So, personally I'm not all that impressed if we're talking about widespread notoriety (and no offense intended towards COG).

                            Originally posted by DebLipp
                            There are Pagan authors who have been active and reputable in the community for years prior to publishing or concurrent with publishing. Local activity, national activity in things like COG, writing in Pagan newsletters (in the past) and websites (nowadays) and maujor magazines like Green Egg or Sagewoman, presenting at festivals, these are all solid ways of building a reputation that have nothing to do with book publishing.
                            You kinda make my point for me here, as I agree with building a reputation through personal effort as opposed to using a glitzy publicity agency.

                            In Her service,
                            Nemesis Descending

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                            • #15
                              I have to agree with Debra Lipp on this one N.D. The only real mistake she ever did was defending Fiona Horne. But then again P.C. had her reasons.
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