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If you could travel to anywhere in the world to see

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  • #16
    I liked the parts of BC I saw, though it was summer then. I drove along the border after going north from Spokane. We ( it was a long time ago) went through Vancouver (as quickly as possible) and over to Vancouver Island campped a day or two, went to Victoria ( nice town) and back to the states. I used to live in a tiny town in the Santa Cruz Mountains in California called Boulder Creek, where it rains a lot and there is much Redwood forest, and BC reminded me a little of that. Except for the cold, I like BC.

    People who complain about the animals running around the streets should move to the big city where they drive around in cars and shoot people from out of the windows. Whats the point of living in the country if you don't see animals? People invaded their space, not the other way around. Come here and visit. This is the only home in the world for the Hector's Dolphins, the smallest dolphins in the world. They only grow to be 4-6 feet long. Cute little rascals
    Its nice to know that the internet has an end, but where's the beginning?
    Blessings and Light
    Raindancer
    Anything worth doing is worth doing 100%

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    • #17
      Yeah, I know what you mean.. Where I used to live (which was even farther away from anywhere than I live now), wild animals roamed all through the town... :bigredgri


      I'll have to ask around for the first page of the 'net... :D

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      • #18
        When I lived in Boulder Creek, it was out in the redwood forest up a hill with redwoods all around. We had a small creek that ran underneath one corner of the house and out on down the hill. We had a redwood growing up through the deck and one corner of the house was held up by an ancient redwood stump. We were regularly raided by raccoons, visited by squirrels and chipmunks, and blue jays. Being the last house, the forest was literally across the "street" which was only wide enough for one car at a time. Especially in fall and winter, you might go for days without hearing a car. I miss the place. I can still hear the creek down below, and falling asleep to the rain on the roof.
        Raindancer
        Anything worth doing is worth doing 100%

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        • #19
          That place sounds nice... Do you miss it?
          I'd really like to stay away from cities, if possible (once I move away from home that is.. ) heheh... I'm too used to being out in the "wilderness" I dont' think I could stand to live in a city....or anywhere within probably 3-4 hours of a city.

          The sounds that I remember, mostly, is avalanches echoing off the mountains (the price to pay for living in a valley ) Love that sound though. :D

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          • #20
            I had to move away later as there weren't any jobs so I moved to a sleepy section of Palo Alto, Ca. which was relatively quiet for a city, but even so, the hardest thing to adjust to was the NOISE. Cars going by, and just noise everywhere. It was quite a shock after the only sounds being the wind in the trees and a blue jay or two.

            I miss Boulder Creek. Before I came out here, not knowing if I would ever return, I was determined to go see the Redwoods one last time, and say goodbye. Trouble was that there was this massive rain storm and it was washing out all the roads and highways. All the good ways were blocked by mudslides, and there was only one way in left... Bear Creek Road.

            Bear Creek Road is a road that it scares me to drive even when its dry and sunny and there aren't many cars on it. Its windy, there's a drop on one side of it most of the way into Boulder Creek, and its very narrow, and at least one blind turn where you pretty much can only get one car through at a time.

            It was wet, raining hard, and there were some small mudslides which partially blocked it in places, but going there was just about the most important thing for me to do, so I went anyway. It was pretty dicey, but I made it and went down into Big Basin State Park where my family had taken us since I was about 5. I walked around and breathed in the rain freshened air, smelled the trees, visited ones I played on as a kid, and said farewell to my beloved Redwoods.

            There is one growing here in town at the Botanical Gardens, and sometimes my kids and I go visit it and give it a hug. We're both a long way from home.

            As fate would have it, I was able to return later that year for a visit, but haven't been able to go back since 91. I hope that I can go back at least one more time someday, and see the Big Dipper again. I miss the Redwoods and the Big Dipper Maybe sometime after the kids grow up.

            The sound of the avalanches sounds cool. I can't picture what that must be like. I was on a cruise up the Inside Passage once and saw and heard glaciers calving which was pretty impressive. The sight of a chunk of ice maybe 50-100 feet across and 300 or more feet long dropping off into the iceflow covered water is amazing.

            I saw the Northern Lights on that cruise, up around Glacier Bay, and it was incredible. I had dreamed about seeing them since I learned that they existed as a kid. I saw some pictures in a pocket science book, and yearned to go see them, but it was a very long way to go. The pictures in a book don't really do justice to the real thing, it was wonderful. I imagine that you must see it often where you live. I think I'm too far norrth to see the Southern Lights, but who knows?

            You got me thinking about all these things that I've been too busy raising kids and worrying about all the slings and arrows to take time for it. Christchurch is a nice city in many ways, but its a city. I wanted to live outside of town near some sort of naturak place, be it stream, hill, seashore, something, but my now-Ex didn't want to do that, and I got a house in the city, but there are some nice places to see close by....Where is Kilimatt ? Where is it in relation to, say Juneau or Sitka? I'll have to get a map and have a look. I've been running off at the keyboard ( more than usual ) but I don't get to walk through these memories very often and they're good ones. Thanks for reminding me.
            Blessings and Light
            Raindancer
            Anything worth doing is worth doing 100%

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            • #21
              Had to get my trusty atlas...

              Yeah, I don't know how anyone can stand cars driving by at all hours of the night...That's the biggest reason for not staying at grandma's house.

              That was great you could go back and say goodbye...I wish I could have done that for the place where I grew up (Kemano, it's about a 3 and a half hour boat ride from here).... It's pretty much gone now, so... I do have a couple of streetsigns from there (:bigredgri) so I do have some momentos at least.

              Of all the nights I sat out my window, I don't ever recall seeing the northern lights, actually.. I saw about a zillion stars though.. That's another thing I really remember is all the stars I could see.

              I couldn't find Juneau or Sitka in my atlas, actually... Are they near the Queen Charlotte Islands? Kitimat is near Prince Rupert (about 1 and a half hours away).. That's about my general area..

              I can always find some way to talk about small places..... Since I'm always around them...Never lived away, never hope to!

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              • #22
                well since I have never been out of new england, there are a lot of places I would love to go. Oh yeah I went to Canada. But I would love to go to Ireland. Celtic art is incredible.
                blessed is the pagan that preaches not, hates not, doubts not.

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                • #23
                  Hi Flaire, those places are actually in the Alaska Panhandle, next to BC. The cruise was up the Inside Passage from Ketchikan to Glacier Bay, stopping in various places along the way, and back. That was a different trip than the one across BC, back in 88. The time we drove across BC was in 74 after going to the Worlds Fair.

                  I think Prince Rupert is south of Ketchikan. A lot of cruises start in Prince Rupert as I recall, but we started in Ketchikan, as I think it gave us more time in the Inside Passage. We saw the Aurora Borealis best at Glacier Bay, as it was the northernmost point that we reached and about the only night it wasn't cloudy.

                  There are about a zillion stars down here too, as I think we face more towards the inner Milky Way, and the air is way cleaner here than up there. When you take pictures, you have to set your camera as if it was an F-Stop or 1 1/2 stops brighter than the light meter indicates. If not you will have a lot of overexposed photos.

                  Especially when you get out of Christchurch and head towards Arthur's Pass, at the Southern Alps, there are just masses and masses of stars. I miss the Big Dipper though. That, and my redwoods.

                  Raindancer
                  Anything worth doing is worth doing 100%

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                  • #24
                    Wow... Okay, that's probably why I couldn't find the places. But that's okay...

                    I never even thought of taking pictures before... I should have tried that before I moved... Where I live now, it's nearly impossible to see the stars... Air's too dirty and I live right in the middle of the town. Bleh...

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