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  • Fascinating Wars?

    War has been a very unfortunate recurring theme in our world. However, it still manages to capture our fascination. Which historical wars fascinate you the most?
    Or what Battles?

    The ones which fascinate me the most, are the American Civil War
    Specifically, the battles of Ghettysburgh, Anteitam, and Bull Run. I think that the Civil War captures my interest because of the nature of brother against brother warfare. So many families were torn apart because of this war.

    The American Revolution because of the nobility of the cause. IMO. I'm specifically fascinated by the Burning of Danbury because that was my hometown I'm also fascinated by all of the "Spy" stories, and the story of Swamp Fox.

    The Scottish Wars of Independence. This has become a recent fascination of mine. During my family research, I found out that my Great Grandmother's Family Crest (Torrence), said on the shield..."I saved the King"..and that this came about because the Torrence Ancestors apparently helped Robert the Bruce to flee to safety in one of the battles.
    Lucas Michael, you are with me still. Not a day will go by that I won't remember. Lucas Michael Demascena con. 5/15, dec. 6/29. Wait for me.

    Forum Guide- History Forum

  • #2
    The Easter Uprising, D-Day, Sherman's March To The Sea, the battles between the British and the different NA Nations during colonisation, the Brits VS the Zulu Nation, the Alamo, the US and Mexico VS the Apache people, both "Incidents" at Wounded Knee, Little Big Horn, Boudecia(sp?) VS the Romans, the Cattle Raid of Cooley, the Trogan War, Battle of Jericho, the Battle over the Boston Harbor, War of 1812, the Crusades....
    Inanna
    Evening Star
    Dispenser of Justice when the moon is new
    Unseen Light
    You illuminate the darkness and show the way
    May my heart be filled with wisdom and love
    -Hymn to Inanna

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    • #3
      The Second Punic Wars fascinate me immenesly. In that war, Carthage fought the Romans. This war fascinates me, since I consider Hannibal, the Carthaginian general, to be such a clever commander.

      I know that war is so brutal and awful; nevertheless, I loved to read about this war. For some reason, I always hope for Hannibal to win, since I consider his strategies, particularly at the battles of Lake Trasimene, Trebia, and Cannae, to be so cunning. However, no matter how many times, I read about the war, Hannibal always loses. It's kind of like watching Top Gun. No matter how many times that I have seen it, I always think that Goose will live, but he never does.

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      • #4
        Mnemosyne, you beat me to it!
        i love studying the art of war. it's too bad that people (especially young people) have to suffer and die.
        but the Second Punic War s what i was going to say too. i did a lengthy term paper on Hannibal Barca in school (shortly after the event!). brilliant thinker, until his unfortunate defeat at Zama.
        i collect coins of that period, and the coinage of Zeugitana (Carthage) is one of my favorites.
        the American Civil War is a interesting subject too, since it's a unique conflict. technology was outdating tactics at a much greater rate than ever before. this probably culminated in the bloody and hopeless battles of WW1. legion thinking in an unlimited war, a recipe for disaster.

        a bit off topic, but has anyone seen the early Stanley Kubrick movie 'Paths of Glory'? Kirk douglas and Adolphe Monjou in WW1 France.
        some people are like slinkies -
        not good for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when they are pushed downs the stairs.

        True enlightenment comes from discovering principles which challenge your spiritual view, not from inventing principles to confirm it.



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        • #5
          No, Greenman, I haven't seen the "Paths of Glory." Is it a good film? I am super impressed with the fact that you collect coins from that period. I have a friend who has done a lot of research on coins in ancient Rome. I too wrote a lengthy paper on Hannibal back in the day. He's such a fascinating historical figure. I remember that Livy wrote that Hannibal's father, Hamilcar, had Hannibal swear an oath at a young age stating that he would attempt to conquer Rome.

          In Greenman's post, Greenman wrote how he likes to study the art of war. "The art of war" words made me automatically think of Machiavelli's work "The Art of War." Has anyone read that work by chance?

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          • #6
            i have the 'Art of War' by TsunTzu, if that's the one you're thinking of.

            legend has it that when Hannibal's father made him swear to defeat Rome, he also gave him a poison ring. this he kept until he 64th year, when he had been chased to the East by a false rumor in Rome that he was mounting against them again. they were STILL afraid of him in his old age! he took the poison after being betrayed by the King of... (i think, it's been along time) Bithynia (i have coins from there too!).

            jeeez... elephants over the Alps!
            some people are like slinkies -
            not good for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when they are pushed downs the stairs.

            True enlightenment comes from discovering principles which challenge your spiritual view, not from inventing principles to confirm it.



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            • #7
              I haven't seen "Paths Of Glory" either. I'll have to look for it.

              I've always loved "The Best Years Of Our Lives". It starred Fredric March, Dana Andrews, and Harold Russell and told the story of what happened to the vets after they came home. I think it was so honest it was called un-American by some critics...
              Inanna
              Evening Star
              Dispenser of Justice when the moon is new
              Unseen Light
              You illuminate the darkness and show the way
              May my heart be filled with wisdom and love
              -Hymn to Inanna

              Comment


              • #8
                What war was the film, "The Best Years of Our Lives" based on? For some reason, I immediately thought of the Vietnam War when I heard that the film is so honest that it could be considered "unAmerican." Also, the vets weren't treated too well when they came home after that war.

                No, Greenman, I haven't heard of Tsun Tzu's Art of War. I've only read Machiavelli's Art of War. I'm a fan of the Florentine writer, Machiavelli, because he is so brutally honest at times. (of course, he is just kissing up to the Medici at other times.) Thanks for reminding me the story about Hannibal and the poison ring. I haven't heard that story in years.

                Yeah, elephants over the Alps, what a wild idea! Actually, I feel kind of bad for the elephants. So many of them died (and Hannibal's men also) and the area is not well-suited for big elephants.

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                • #9
                  behold...
                  The Goddess!

                  http://www.lawrence.edu/dept/art/bue...logue/021.html
                  some people are like slinkies -
                  not good for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when they are pushed downs the stairs.

                  True enlightenment comes from discovering principles which challenge your spiritual view, not from inventing principles to confirm it.



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Pretty cool link, Greenman. How did I know that the link would probably be about coins in the ancient world? I could never get into studying coins in antiquity for some reason. Perhaps I have to blame that scholar Michael Crawford for that. Michael Crawford wrote the book The Roman Republic. In the book, he makes many references to coins. However, the book is so dreadfully boring that I now do not associate coins with excitement. After reading your posts about coins, I got out that book. Guess what's on the cover? That's right; a third century b.c. plate with war elephants on it. The plate made me think: did the Romans use war elephants as well then?

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                    • #11
                      In my studies of the Art of War, I certainly enjoy studying wars that demonstrated tactical skill on the highest level...

                      Like the Second Punic War...Hannibal Barca was indeed one of the brightest generals ever. Cannae is a classic, textbook battle.

                      I happen to like the Napoleonic Wars, the Second World War, The Second Gulf War...

                      The First World War was just slaughter and stupid generals. The American Civil War presaged most of those horrors, as did the Russo-Japanese War. But the European generals didn't bother to study these conflicts, and ended up making the same mistakes.

                      Also I study wars of great importance in the development of the world...like the American Revolution, the Persian Wars, the Roman Civil Wars, the Gallic War, and the battle of Chalons.

                      Lets see, as far as texts, I would love to read Machiavelli's The Art of War . I have read Sun Tzu's book, and Clausewitz, as well as Napoleon's Maxims.

                      Hmm...as far as coins go... I find ancient coins and monetary systems quite fascinating.

                      One of the more interesting set ups was in Alexandria. As in most of Egypt, coins were not used, as grain was the coin of the realm, so to speak. Since lugging large volumes of grain around was difficult, the Ptolemys developed banks with a giro system similar to what is used in Europe today (Europeans didn't use checks like the Americans and British until recently) to transfer balances between accounts at the bank.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mnemosyne
                        What war was the film, "The Best Years of Our Lives" based on? For some reason, I immediately thought of the Vietnam War when I heard that the film is so honest that it could be considered "unAmerican." Also, the vets weren't treated too well when they came home after that war.
                        I'm sorry. I thought I mentioned it was about WWII. Excellent film, shows the flipside of what the heroes had to deal with after the war.

                        My great uncle had a friend who married a Japanese woman during WWII. She was spit on and insulted everywhere she went. I believe she ended up divorcing him and going home.

                        My dad served during Vietnam but was one of the lucky few who were stationed elsewhere so when I think of the horrors of war I tend to think of WWII. My grandfather served under Patton and not only saw action but also worked at the concentration camps.

                        I've never really paid that much attention to Vietnam. I know my mother lost several friends but she doesn't really talk about it.
                        Last edited by Earthcup; April 13th, 2002, 07:57 PM.
                        Inanna
                        Evening Star
                        Dispenser of Justice when the moon is new
                        Unseen Light
                        You illuminate the darkness and show the way
                        May my heart be filled with wisdom and love
                        -Hymn to Inanna

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I got to hear a lot of cool Patton stories from my Granddad who fought under Patton in North Africa.

                          Yeah, he mentioned several of the horrors of war from him, and he was permanently stuck with shaking hands from the shell shock.

                          My uncle went to Vietnam, in the Army Corps of Engineers, and what he saw was so horrific he refuses to talk about Vietnam at all; and almost strangled my mother in his sleep while having a flashback nightmare.

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                          • #14
                            Have you ever seen "A Bill Of Divorcement"? It's a really old movie with John Barrymore* and Katherine Hepburn. He's plays a WWI vet with shellshock. It's hard to find but worth it.

                            My grandfather would try to climb the walls and sleepwalk when he had horrible nightmares. He would never, ever talk about the war until one day my dad was visiting and turned the tv to Hogan's Heroes. My mom and granndma held their breath but he really liked the show. After that he began to talk a little but he never says much. I don't know if he still has nightmares but I know he finally stopped sleepwalking.

                            *Drew's grandfather
                            Inanna
                            Evening Star
                            Dispenser of Justice when the moon is new
                            Unseen Light
                            You illuminate the darkness and show the way
                            May my heart be filled with wisdom and love
                            -Hymn to Inanna

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Has anyone out there read a book called "Shrapnel in the Heart"?

                              We read excerpts of it in Highschool, for my American History and Literature class. It is a collection of stories about soldiers from the Vietnam wall, and the memories attatched to some of the paraphanalia left at the Vietnam War Memorial. The Book is highly moving, it had my entire class in tears. I highly suggest it.

                              Here is a link to the website:

                              http://www.illyria.com/shrapnel.html

                              P.S. It is very rare that a book comes along, that moves you so deeply, that you refer to it on a message board, some eight years later! lol.
                              Last edited by Danustouch; April 13th, 2002, 11:01 PM.
                              Lucas Michael, you are with me still. Not a day will go by that I won't remember. Lucas Michael Demascena con. 5/15, dec. 6/29. Wait for me.

                              Forum Guide- History Forum

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