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Noble Savage myth covers up truth

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  • #31
    Originally posted by C. Iulia Regilia View Post
    I think it's because of our culture. We tend to look to technological solutions to fix our problems. We're dependant on our technology by choice. Any problem that comes up we look to a tool to fix it, or create a system. It's our culture probably more so since the industrial revolution. If we have a problem with electricity, rather than using less, we make a better grid. Rather than make it possible for people to walk places for exercise, we build treadmills.
    You do realize that you're complaining about technology on a computer, on the internet, right?

    If a boulder is in the way, we get out the dynomite rather than go around it. Not all societies at all times in history have done so. In fact in iceland there was a case of a boulder where they wanted to build a road. They couldn't move it, so they figured that a spirit lived in that rock and had no intention of moving, so they built the roads around the rock. It's possible. But not without a massive cultural change.
    Sometimes the scenic route is nice, but sometimes that road NEEDS to be there. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking the direct route if you are capable of doing so. Building around a boulder is cute, but let's face it - it's much more efficient to build a tunnel than have vehicles burning extra fuel and energy going up one mountainside and down another... not to mention that by building a tunnel, you're preserving the rest of the mountain.

    There is a give and a take with everything in this world. Positives and negatives to every action.
    "The cosmos is also within us, we're made of star stuff.
    We are a way for the cosmos to know itself."

    Carl Sagan, as quoted by The Symphony of Science

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Kraheera View Post
      A good example would be how native americans would use every bit of a bison that they killed.
      while they certainly had a use for each part, it didn't mean they used each bit of each bison. In fact, as Kaylara stated, they frequently killed way more than they used. When things wore out, or there were left overs (no refrigeration) they would dump the stuff slightly outside of their camp. In fact, all the waste went there. People simply urinated wherever as did their animals, so a native American camp smelled pretty bad. When it got so stinky and filled with flies and vermin, they would simply pick up and move. Due to the fact that there was a lot of land and few people, by the time they came back around to that area, it was overgrown and usable again. Far from the myth of using everything, being "one with nature" our ancestors tended to kill over the needed number of animals, use burn systems to clear land, leave their garbage where they stood (remember their garbage would still decompose faster than plastic).

      In fact humans haven't changed much at all from the time there was some human spark. Its just our toys last longer.
      Life's journey is not to arrive safely at the grave in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting; "HOLY SHIT!!!! What a ride!"

      A celebrant of nannymas and sarabethvmas

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Kaylara View Post
        That is a bad example, as in many places where bison were killed, they did not use every part of every animal that they killed, or even eat every animal. If you look at any area where a game jump was used, (areas where they ran the bison over a cliff) they would kill way more than they could possibly eat, and would leave quite a bit to rot. They certainly could use every part of the animal, but that doesn't mean that they did when circumstances made it unnecessary.
        I'm sorry, but I'm afraid you must be mistaken. Everyone knows the Native Americans are, and were, completely and flawlessly perfect. There's no such thing as an indigenous group that ever does anything wrong; they're such beings of pure light that it simply isn't possible. The entire reason why our ancestors slaughtered them, and nobody else could ever do such a thing, is because our ancestors weren't actually human; they were demons, who were uncontrollably addicted to consuming the flesh and blood of infants.

        To a marginal degree, we've evolved. Since the eighteenth century, we've realised that devouring live babies isn't considered an acceptable thing to do in polite society; but we had to transfer the addiction to something. That's why we invented Wall Street.

        That's the reason why humanity is most likely going to become extinct, though. It's only really white society (and, of course, the male half of white society) that's to blame; it honestly is completely and exclusively our fault. We're just too uncontrollably and compulsively evil. It's hard wired in; the Dark Side is impossible to resist. The man who played Colonel Quarritch in Avatar, honestly wasn't really acting hardly at all; we're actually just like that in real life.

        We do, however, know that of course if we'd simply left the Native Americans and Australian Aborigines alone, they would have been able to maintain that lifestyle for literally any amount of time, and they never would have had to change at all; billions of years, even.

        I want to sincerely apologise to everyone here, for the fact that we weren't more like them. It's genuinely tragic.
        Last edited by petrus4; April 21st, 2011, 03:25 PM.
        "I worship the greatly beautiful one, with limbs the colour of thunderclouds, who is naked and sits on the corpse of Shiva, who has three eyes and earrings made of the bones of two young handsome boys, who is garlanded with skulls and flowers. In her lower left and upper right hands she holds a man's head and a sword, her other two hands bestowing boons and banishing fear. Her hair is greatly dishevelled."

        -- Chapter 13, The
        Brihad Nila Tantra.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by petrus4 View Post
          I'm sorry, but I'm afraid you must be mistaken. Everyone knows the Native Americans are, and were, completely and flawlessly perfect. There's no such thing as an indigenous group that ever does anything wrong; they're such beings of pure light that it simply isn't possible. The entire reason why our ancestors slaughtered them, and nobody else could ever do such a thing, is because our ancestors weren't actually human; they were demons, who were uncontrollably addicted to consuming the flesh and blood of infants.

          To a marginal degree, we've evolved. Since the eighteenth century, we've realised that devouring live babies isn't considered an acceptable thing to do in polite society; but we had to transfer the addiction to something. That's why we invented Wall Street.

          That's the reason why humanity is most likely going to become extinct, though. It's only really white society (and, of course, the male half of white society) that's to blame; it honestly is completely and exclusively our fault. We're just too uncontrollably and compulsively evil. It's hard wired in; the Dark Side is impossible to resist. The man who played Colonel Quarritch in Avatar, honestly wasn't really acting hardly at all; we're actually just like that in real life.

          We do, however, know that of course if we'd simply left the Native Americans and Australian Aborigines alone, they would have been able to maintain that lifestyle for literally any amount of time, and they never would have had to change at all; billions of years, even.

          I want to sincerely apologise to everyone here, for the fact that we weren't more like them. It's genuinely tragic.
          Y-you're being sarcastic, right?
          "The cosmos is also within us, we're made of star stuff.
          We are a way for the cosmos to know itself."

          Carl Sagan, as quoted by The Symphony of Science

          Comment


          • #35
            Actually I believe that our technology and use of resources against nature is killing us.
            Tribes around the world where people are living very rusticly have sparse illness and diseases and there are reports that they live a very long time without much trouble that developed nations elders face.

            Other than France, our diets are heavily based on artery clogging salts and transfats and tons of who-knows-exactly-what in our food. Fattening us up and shortening our lifespan.

            Our fat is also thanks to our addictive, convenient techno gadgets. I predict there will also be research on the rise of neck spasms as I see more people more frequently looking down while texting CONSTANTLY.

            Our government is out to deplete our population as well by making our lives more difficult to lead healthy proper, lifestyles. Rasing the prices on healthy, unpoisoned food, to the point that a bag a of chips is cheaper than a bag of apples.

            We are dependent on gas, so much so, that we are panicking about the possible outcome of what would happen when there is no more oil left. Like that'll happen anytime soon.

            We are slaves of our money. Our very right to healthcare, nutrition, shelter and water is based on how many pieces of paper and metal discs you own. Yes, even in canada despite our free access to basic healthcare, we have to pay lots just to get a dental check. You have to pay the hospital when your in labor. And the nurse will still treat you like some sort of animal in a testing lab. Dirty surgical tool, anyone?

            We rely on these prescriptions like they were made by the doctors we trust.Uh,.. actually they are made by pharmacutical companies that advertise their products with lies and exaggerations. Look that investigation on YAZ.

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            • #36
              [quote=Sequoia;4271631]You do realize that you're complaining about technology on a computer, on the internet, right?[quote]

              Technology is great, I'll be the first to say that, but sometimes technology is not the right answer. I think its the same thing I see in the political parties -- it doesn't matter what the problem is, the solution is already there, and you just sort of plug in the problem to the ready made solution. It's a sort of "magical thinking" so to speak to suggest that one approach -- be it more technolgy, more tax cuts, or whatever you favored solution is -- is always the right answer. Sometimes it is. Sometimes it isn't. And to me, the technological solution is just that kind of "magical thinking" it is culturally considered the best solution. New technology is always the best -- we'll spend millions of dollars to design a pen that works in weightlessness, the Soviets brought a pencil. Both worked, and I don't think that the weightless pen was a superior solution just because it was new tech.

              And I don't think that saying that technology is not always the answer necessarily means that I hate technology. I don't think that favoring or opposing any idea in one instance means that I hate the idea itself. I personally think that we tend to do the same thing with medicine. We give people drugs to lower cholesterol or restore bone loss, or deal with stress. My thought is that while such things may be great as a last resort, that it would be better to have a solution that focuses on preventing these diseases in the first place rather than let them fester until it's a crisis and then prescibe a pill (which probably has at least one unpleasant side effect). I don't see that as anti-drug or anti-medicine, just that it's one tool in the arsenal, and you should properly be looking at all the tools. Promoting a healthier diet would probably do as much to reduce medical costs as the best health care reform that exists.


              Sometimes the scenic route is nice, but sometimes that road NEEDS to be there. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking the direct route if you are capable of doing so. Building around a boulder is cute, but let's face it - it's much more efficient to build a tunnel than have vehicles burning extra fuel and energy going up one mountainside and down another... not to mention that by building a tunnel, you're preserving the rest of the mountain.

              There is a give and a take with everything in this world. Positives and negatives to every action.
              I think you are right about the mountain, but probably not about the boulder. Going around the boulder is a matter of maybe 100 ft. It's not that big of a deal. A mountain is much bigger and you'd have to divert traffic miles out of the way. But I think looking for a valley nearby would probably be just as good.

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