Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Granny Magic

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Granny Magic

    Hello all.

    I'm very interested in "Granny Magic". I have a book about it, but I would love more information. Does anyone have any good website/book recommendations? Or even just information in general?

    Thanks!
    "Be evil--you smile more."

    --Brady, our beloved GM, during a WoD session.

  • #2
    Originally posted by BelovedDru View Post
    Hello all.

    I'm very interested in "Granny Magic". I have a book about it, but I would love more information. Does anyone have any good website/book recommendations? Or even just information in general?

    Thanks!
    What's the title and author of the book you have? I'm curious too.

    Ben Gruagach
    MysticWicks forum guide in "Paths: Wicca", "Books" and "History"
    author of The Wiccan Mystic: Exploring a Magickal Spiritual Path
    visit my website at http://www.witchgrotto.com
    read my LiveJournal blog
    find me on Facebook

    Comment


    • #3
      http://www.amazon.com/Mugworts-May-L.../dp/0964619709

      It's called "Mugworts in May" by Linda Ours Rago. It's more about Appalachian herbal traditions in West Virginia and around the area, but it does devote a section to Granny Magic.

      PS--sorry it took me so long to get back to this.
      "Be evil--you smile more."

      --Brady, our beloved GM, during a WoD session.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BelovedDru View Post
        http://www.amazon.com/Mugworts-May-L.../dp/0964619709

        It's called "Mugworts in May" by Linda Ours Rago. It's more about Appalachian herbal traditions in West Virginia and around the area, but it does devote a section to Granny Magic.

        PS--sorry it took me so long to get back to this.
        Thanks for the info -- I'll have to look for that one!

        Ben Gruagach
        MysticWicks forum guide in "Paths: Wicca", "Books" and "History"
        author of The Wiccan Mystic: Exploring a Magickal Spiritual Path
        visit my website at http://www.witchgrotto.com
        read my LiveJournal blog
        find me on Facebook

        Comment


        • #5
          Granny Magic isn't something I've heard anything about - but it sounds like the old Hedge Witches and Wise Women. I did a Google and found a bunch of listings for Granny Magic. Sounds like an interesting continuation of witchcraft that got lost in the mountains in the U.S. and has recently been discovered by outsiders.
          ____________
          If you make a customer happy, he'll tell 3 other people.
          If he's not happy, he'll tell 20 others.



          Comment


          • #6
            This is what my own personal tradition is, more or less. I recommend looking into the Foxfire book series. They are full of herbal remedies, folklore, superstitions, and certain cultural practices of Appalachia.
            Our Blog! The Intuitive Unschooler

            Freaky Mama to Arlo, Donovan, and Iris! (Homeschooled since birth!)

            as well as three cats, six cockatiels, and one parakeet. :uhhuhuh:

            Comment


            • #7
              I just remembered a book that might cover some of this type of magic: "Ozark Magic and Folklore" by Vance Randolph.

              Ben Gruagach
              MysticWicks forum guide in "Paths: Wicca", "Books" and "History"
              author of The Wiccan Mystic: Exploring a Magickal Spiritual Path
              visit my website at http://www.witchgrotto.com
              read my LiveJournal blog
              find me on Facebook

              Comment


              • #8
                You might also find a lot of things useful in Green Magic and Hedge Magic books.

                Convallaria


                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the info, everyone. I remembered that they are also called Wise Women--but from what I've heard, (and read, obviously), there are still "traditional" practitioners of Granny Magic. That's what is shortly discussed in Mugworts in May.

                  Granted, they practice differently now--they used to be midwives and doctors in their own right, and they delivered babies and took care of the people in the area because few could afford doctors. But then supposedly laws came out requiring liscenses to practice any kind of medicine, and they sort of fell into obscurity around the turn of the 20th century, but many still practiced in secret. It's pretty hard to outlaw gardens, and well, if someone wants to "trade herbs" or happen to walk off with some...well...:hahugh:

                  Also, according to Rago, a lot of our modern customs (at least in Appalachia) come from this old kind of magic. So we're all Granny Witches in one way or another, haha.
                  "Be evil--you smile more."

                  --Brady, our beloved GM, during a WoD session.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I grew up in appalachian magic it is very intrinisic and almost mundane in its commnplace-ness. They magic I practice is very much rooted in the mindset of those old applachians. Practicality, simplicity, and making do. Its hard not to look around and still see it all around, for example blue glass on window sills, aint just to be pretty, its rooted in a very old tradition. Good to see others interested in it!
                    Bobby

                    hillbillywitchcraft.wordpress.com -a blog about magic, spirits, and life in the southern celtic appalachians yall

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I second the recommendation of the Foxfire books for folk wisdom and herbal remedy. You may also be able to find local lore / folk customs and remedy books at your library in the local history section. I know I've found a number at mine- Hoosier Home Remedies is one that I can recall from my locale. http://www.amazon.com/Hoosier-Home-R.../dp/0911198776
                      Libris

                      "Kindness is more important than wisdom, and the recognition of this is the beginning of wisdom." ~Theodore Rubin

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is an excellent book, and discusses Granny Women as well as all sorts of folk magic & superstition handed down from generation to generation. Having been born in & lived in Arkansas for most of my life, and having travelled around the Ozarks quite a bit, I can attest to the fact that it's much like Voodoo or Hoodoo in Louisiana....even the most devout Christians still believe in some of this old magic. Shoot, when my daughter was having trouble with teething pains, my own Daddy told me about how his mother was told by his nanny to plant cotton seed under the back porch to ease his teething pains. Folk remedies & magic still have a fairly big presence in the South & in more rural areas of the country in general. What in interesting subject!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Can't remember the author name, but I heard of a newer book on this topic called staubs and ditchwater.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The Foxire series is excellent for everything pertaining to Appalatchia.

                            I'm not a granny but do practice much of what is so labeled. There are male practitioners in those parts, though it's the home remedies which usually survive.
                            Tsalagi Nvwoti Didahnvwesgi Ale Didahnesesgi
                            (Cherokee medicine practitioner of left and right hand paths)
                            anikutani.stfu-kthx.net - The Anikutani Tradition

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X