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  • Windsmith
    replied
    Thank you so much, Birdy, for all of these excellent suggestions. I'm putting them all on my to-read list!

    Originally posted by Birdy View Post
    Oh and Windsmith, your not cynical, just smart.
    Aw, shucks. Thanks! Part of me wants the Cape Cod gang to have deep moral objections to the project, be they historical, aesthetic, ornithological - whatever. I would still disagree, but at least I'd know they have convictions. But the more I read about them, the more I think they've just been struck with a bad case of the NIMBYs, and I want to shout, "Hey! Kennedy! Siddown and shuddup!"

    Maybe they'd like a nice wave energy system instead? Those things are cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • Birdy
    replied
    Spinoza, definitely. He is the pantheist philosopher.

    "The Sacred Depths of Nature" by Ursula Goodenough
    A reverent description of evolution and how it can inspire religion... and stuff, I can't remember, I haven't read most of these books YET, they're just on my must read list.

    "A Religion of Nature" by Donald A. Crosby
    Not for the general MW crowd. He tells his life story of moving through the various conceptions of (mono, panen and then pan)theism into atheism and then back into pantheism and puts forward the idea of a religion of nature.

    The poetry of Mary Oliver. She herself is not a pantheist but her poems (and non-poetry related essays) are nature reverent in a way that connects wilderness with humanity. I like "American Primitive" and... I forgot the name of the other one..

    If you really want to go into the classics there is Marcus Aurelius's (am I spelling that right?) "The Meditations"

    and then there is

    "Celestially Auspicious Occasions: Seasons, Cycles, & Celebrations" (author forgotten) - It looks at ways that different peoples, all the way back into neolithic times, celebrated the solstices and equinoxes etc.. and it's credible (ei. no revisionist utopian matriarchy nonsense)

    I am currently looking into finding some works of Brian Swimme...

    that's all for now.

    Oh and Windsmith, your not cynical, just smart.

    Leave a comment:


  • Windsmith
    replied
    Originally posted by EJ1096 View Post
    I didnt read the artice But All I could think of when I read that people where opposed to them due to the "eye soar" factor was they would not cut down forests to put these things up. because there would not be enough wind that blow around forests. They are building them on open plains and farmers are selling aprts of ther land to have these put up.
    besides I too think they look cool
    That's a good point about the forests. But a lot of turbines do also go up on hilltops and mountaintops, which I think is where some of the objections come from.

    A lot of it has to do with money, too. There are hundreds of wind farms around the country that are as big as or bigger than the proposed Cape Cod project, in areas that have views that are just as stunning. The Cape Cop project protesters get a lot more press because they're super-rich and have convinced Ted Kennedy to shill for them.

    Or maybe I'm just cynical.

    Leave a comment:


  • EJ1096
    replied
    Originally posted by Windsmith View Post
    Tough crowd, eh? OK, how about this article about opponents of wind power. As a wind power student, I think about things like this a lot. Obviously, wind alone can't solve our energy woes, but the climate's tanking fast and the oil's disappearing faster. I see the point of those who argue that we need to keep beautiful vistas beautiful, and that turbines can mar the landscape. But this is such an imporant source of energy, and I think a turbine - heck, even 30 turbines - creates far less of an eyesore than a new coal or nuclear plant on the same land (though maybe I'm biased, as I think the turbines are gorgeous). Plus, if we don't clean up our energy act fast, there'll be no more beautiful views at all, unbroken or otherwise.

    What do you guys think?
    I didnt read the artice But All I could think of when I read that people where opposed to them due to the "eye soar" factor was they would not cut down forests to put these things up. because there would not be enough wind that blow around forests. They are building them on open plains and farmers are selling aprts of ther land to have these put up.
    besides I too think they look cool

    Leave a comment:


  • Windsmith
    replied
    Tough crowd, eh? OK, how about this article about opponents of wind power. As a wind power student, I think about things like this a lot. Obviously, wind alone can't solve our energy woes, but the climate's tanking fast and the oil's disappearing faster. I see the point of those who argue that we need to keep beautiful vistas beautiful, and that turbines can mar the landscape. But this is such an imporant source of energy, and I think a turbine - heck, even 30 turbines - creates far less of an eyesore than a new coal or nuclear plant on the same land (though maybe I'm biased, as I think the turbines are gorgeous). Plus, if we don't clean up our energy act fast, there'll be no more beautiful views at all, unbroken or otherwise.

    What do you guys think?

    Leave a comment:


  • Windsmith
    started a topic Things to read

    Things to read

    I just found this short essay by Chet Raymo on the Science & Spirit website, and I adore it. What does anybody know about this magazine?

    What else have people read that they feel reflects the way they feel about pantheism and/or the Universe? Anything really great that they'd love everyone to read? Articles, books, magazines, backs of cereal boxes? What?
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