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  • RavenStars
    replied
    I'm suffering through a purge of computer files after a scare sent my Mac to the "garage" to get fixed. I wish they gave loners like my mechanic! Anyway, I found the following posted here long ago by Windsmith. I do not have permission to do this, but it is here somewhere. I'm reposting because I think it takes on an important question of what DO pantheists DO if they don't have tools and cast circles (which some do, by the way). I found Windsmith to be a profoundly insightful teacher. This post is proof.

    Windsmith and daily rituals
    I'm a sucker for the small ceremonies of daily life. When I was a "normal" Pagan, I tried to shoehorn special rituals into my day. Now I'm better served spiritually by finding the sacred in my existing routines, and adding Pagan ritual elements for "flair."
    • Anchoring/releasing: First thing when I wake up in the morning, I anchor myself in my body and my life. Last thing before I go to sleep at night, I release mself to wander off and have fun dreaming. I'd love to explain in greater detail, but since we moved my brain refuses to use the one I painstakingly perfected over the last few months in the apartment, so I'm in the process of creating a new one.
    • Exercise meditation: While I ride my stationary bike in the morning, I sink my attention down into my body and be aware. It's being with What Is - even when What Is means a sweaty waistband and aching calf muscles.
    • Shower ritual:In addition to the cleansing power of water, I envision the other things I do in the shower - the shampooing, the body washing, etc., as giving me strength, perserverance, or keen insights, or things like that.
    • Song offering: During my commute, I sing "offering songs," little ditties (blues numbers, mostly) of my own composing. I sing to the sun on my way to work. In the darker half of the year, I sing to the moon on my way home, but at this time of year I struggle with that, so I sing something seasonal, or one of my goofy Pantheism songs. It's a focused celebration of those parts of What Is that I feel best connected to.
    • Devotional walk: For my morning break, I take a walk. While I walk, I celebrate the four winds. I know I'll get nothing from them in return, but I adore wind, and honoring them with word and breath feels very good to me.
    • Tea meditation: For my afternoon break, I make a small pot of tea. I sit and watch it brew. I know that sounds criminally boring, but I relish the inner quiet and the opportunity to recenter myself in the midst of my busy work day. Also, my tea set has 2 cups; I fill them both but only drink from one. If someone comes into my cube while I'm drinking, I offer them the other cup. It's a gesture of sacred hospitality and connectedness. If no one wants tea, I pour it out as a libation to the Earth, as a reminder that I don't have to co∏nsume everything in my path.
    • Grace: For a long time after giving up Christianity, I gave up saying grace over meals. But I missed that moment of appreciation. So instead of thanking god(s), I thank the plants and animals who became my food, the farmers who raised them, the butchers and bakers who turned them into food, and the truck drivers and grocery-store shelf stockers who brought them to me. I appreciate my food so much more when I remember to do that.
    Dang. That's a big list of little things. They're all small, simple actions that do so much to anchor me in my life and in the Cosmos, and to remind me of the immanent holiness of every thing and every moment that makes up What Is.

    Leave a comment:


  • RavenStars
    replied
    I'm suffering through a purge of computer files after a scare sent my Mac to the "garage" to get fixed. I wish they gave loners like my mechanic! Anyway, I found the following posted here long ago by Windsmith. I do not have permission to do this, but it is here somewhere. I'm reposting because I think it takes on an important question of what DO pantheists DO if they don't have tools and cast circles (which some do, by the way). I found Windsmith to be a profoundly insightful teacher. This post is proof.

    Windsmith and daily rituals
    I'm a sucker for the small ceremonies of daily life. When I was a "normal" Pagan, I tried to shoehorn special rituals into my day. Now I'm better served spiritually by finding the sacred in my existing routines, and adding Pagan ritual elements for "flair."
    • Anchoring/releasing: First thing when I wake up in the morning, I anchor myself in my body and my life. Last thing before I go to sleep at night, I release mself to wander off and have fun dreaming. I'd love to explain in greater detail, but since we moved my brain refuses to use the one I painstakingly perfected over the last few months in the apartment, so I'm in the process of creating a new one.
    • Exercise meditation: While I ride my stationary bike in the morning, I sink my attention down into my body and be aware. It's being with What Is - even when What Is means a sweaty waistband and aching calf muscles.
    • Shower ritual:In addition to the cleansing power of water, I envision the other things I do in the shower - the shampooing, the body washing, etc., as giving me strength, perserverance, or keen insights, or things like that.
    • Song offering: During my commute, I sing "offering songs," little ditties (blues numbers, mostly) of my own composing. I sing to the sun on my way to work. In the darker half of the year, I sing to the moon on my way home, but at this time of year I struggle with that, so I sing something seasonal, or one of my goofy Pantheism songs. It's a focused celebration of those parts of What Is that I feel best connected to.
    • Devotional walk: For my morning break, I take a walk. While I walk, I celebrate the four winds. I know I'll get nothing from them in return, but I adore wind, and honoring them with word and breath feels very good to me.
    • Tea meditation: For my afternoon break, I make a small pot of tea. I sit and watch it brew. I know that sounds criminally boring, but I relish the inner quiet and the opportunity to recenter myself in the midst of my busy work day. Also, my tea set has 2 cups; I fill them both but only drink from one. If someone comes into my cube while I'm drinking, I offer them the other cup. It's a gesture of sacred hospitality and connectedness. If no one wants tea, I pour it out as a libation to the Earth, as a reminder that I don't have to co∏nsume everything in my path.
    • Grace: For a long time after giving up Christianity, I gave up saying grace over meals. But I missed that moment of appreciation. So instead of thanking god(s), I thank the plants and animals who became my food, the farmers who raised them, the butchers and bakers who turned them into food, and the truck drivers and grocery-store shelf stockers who brought them to me. I appreciate my food so much more when I remember to do that.
    Dang. That's a big list of little things. They're all small, simple actions that do so much to anchor me in my life and in the Cosmos, and to remind me of the immanent holiness of every thing and every moment that makes up What Is.

    Leave a comment:


  • RavenStars
    replied
    Another comment, this one about needing special ritual things to practice your path. We live in a culture steeped in materialism and merchandising, so its almost automatic to need special "stuff" to celebrate the divine. Pantheists in general aren't into ritual things, many do not have altars or the other pagan regalia. Spending hundreds of dollars on a wand is a bit strange. The divine is everywhere around us, or at least everywhere in the natural world. A fallen stick might just have a greater concentration of "magic," or some other special nature, then something that has been heavily modified and altered. It's not what you use or what you wear, it's how you take yourself into divine connection. I've worshiped sunsets that covered half the sky, worshipped birds through binoculars, worshipped cumulonimbus exploding in the desert air, and even worshipped the latest genetic wonders from 600 million years ago. Practicing magic, ritualized prayer, and forging an identity are a big part of having tools and costume. Certainly not insignificant purposes. At the same time, an altar is sort of a strange thing -- I am forced to use one now because I am house bound -- but it is symbolic for me, the four quarters, the solar holy days. But the first rain after our seasonal drought means more to me. As does studying climatology, astronomy, paleontology and earth sciences. If I could live on Walden Pond or its equivalent, I would. My ritual tools would be a nature journal, a few pens, and watercolors with brushes. Note that even the best watercolors do not cost hundreds of dollars.

    Leave a comment:


  • RavenStars
    replied
    Like anything else inherently undefinable, Pantheism is ultimately defined by the user. Biologists argue about what life is, toss in the various "experts" on what extra-planetry life might be, and it quickly become undefinable. An individual can define for themselves or ascribe to a school of thought, but there is always someone who has a different departure with evidence to prove it. From what I've read the science based Pantheist have different intellectual and emotional experiences, then say an atheist who finds it helpful to believe there is some order in the apparent chaos. These different "flavors" make Pantheism very hard to codify. In fact there are only a few published works on Pantheism, unlike the major religions or even Wicca.

    For me the sense of ALL that I feel at times is expansive and only described by metaphor, symally, instrumental music, and visual stimulus like deep space photos or natural landscapes. A cumulonimbus cloud is not divine but it is a shorthand for the huge hydrological cycle that led to its creation. Time matters to me as well. The Grand Canyon is eons of time compressed into rocks. The night sky is looking back in time. On the other side is the reality of me, who I am in this moment, who I was and who I will become -- layers of another sort compressed by the passage of time.

    Often Pantheism is about being an individual within a much larger context. This alone is enough to set ourselves apart. Most religion is about rules, codes of behavior, community, and types of struggle or triumph. Windsmith and others here were very interested in ritualizing their understanding of Pantheism, partially to make it part of their lives and partially to address the almost passive nature of Pantheism. Just being an observer of the greater ALL is no different then going to church and putting your fingers in your ears.

    Lacking a mythos or ritual structure is probably why most seekers go elsewhere. Traditional, non-pagan, Pantheists seem to be happy with the solitary intellectual understanding and emotional experiences. Those who gathered here needed something more. Often to celebrate the passing seasons, and sometimes specific events like blue moons or exceptional high tides. I've been very interested in the mythos of elements and four directions -- shorthand again for larger forces.

    More recently I've been thinking about where I live. In the past I purchased maps and studied the geology and archeology. Some intrepid soul published the regional lay lines (pretty interesting stuff actually). Being mostly housebound now I'm curious about the architecture of where I live, the lines of electricity and water. Yesterday I opened doors and windows to let the scent of rain freshen the rooms. While certainly not on a cosmic scale, it is a vital one. Better air quality for one which is vital chemistry. But also that sensation of deep breathing and the dampness on my skin. It is a mix of poetry, curiosity, and amateur science. My relationship with the ALL is about experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cassie
    replied
    Well I am in essence an atheist. I don't believe there is a creator God separate from the rest of creation. However I do think that there is a creative force present in the universe that can be experienced in nature. Satanism is a philosophy but I do think Satan and many of the Pagan Gods could be egregores, thoughtforms or other manifestations of the human mind and/or of nature itself. But nature and all the laws of physics is the driving force. That's pretty close to pantheism, isn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • RavenStars
    replied
    Hey Cassie! Please post. I'm trying to generate traffic. Why does pantheism work for you?

    I got pissed off about the guy in the robe telling me what to do and think. So I went pagan. Wasn't much for a goddess ordained telling me what to do and think, either. Enter the pagan -ism plague. I went back to _my_ basics.
    1. there's a whole lot of shit I don't understand and don't like, but some of it is super cool!
    2. I love celebrating natural and nature things (seasons, weather, etc.)
    3. I feel more alive when I focus on these things (instead of dogma, etc)
    There are plenty of complicated "why" answers but these are the basics for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • RavenStars
    replied
    Is there anything on Mystic Wicks that doesn't count? Well, besides abusive posts. In a way we're all trying to figure this out. If your path happens to be secure, you still have to live in your culture.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cassie
    replied
    I'm a Satanist with Pantheist leanings, does that count?

    Leave a comment:


  • RavenStars
    started a topic Pantheists of MysticWicks Untie!

    Pantheists of MysticWicks Untie!

    Hi, everyone. I'm praying that some of the fabulous people who used to inhabit this forum come back. I missed them so much over the years and really missed the resources in the stickies. If you're curious, new, or old, come mine the pixels! We look at the world differently but are still (mostly) pagans. Pantheism can be very intellectual but it is based in experiential. I call it living in a sacred world. Or to go B movie: It's alive!!!

    Post comments, attitude, questions, or whatever interests you at the moment.
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