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what author affected your Wiccan beliefs/practices most profoundly?

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  • what author affected your Wiccan beliefs/practices most profoundly?

    Here's an interesting question for the Wiccans on the board here.

    What author or book affected your Wiccan beliefs and/or practices the most profoundly? Why? Did the book just feel like it triggered an awakening for you, or did it perhaps bring out such strong disagreements in you that you were forced to examine your own beliefs and practices?

    For me I think the book that affected me most profoundly was Starhawk's "The Spiral Dance." I know some people say she's not really Wiccan, but the structure is there enough for it to count as Wicca for me, and it is based on a lot of Wiccan core material (like the Charge of the Goddess.)

    I read it when I was in high school and it was one of my first real exposures to truly feminist and ecologically-minded material. I had read other books on Wicca (like Margot Adler's "Drawing Down the Moon" and also the Farrar's "Witches Bible") but Starhawk's was truly poetic and expressed some of the spirit and soul of what Wicca is to me. It taught me about connecting with Spirit, honouring the Earth, and expressing my spirituality through art.

    Ben Gruagach
    MysticWicks forum guide in "Paths: Wicca", "Books" and "History"
    author of The Wiccan Mystic: Exploring a Magickal Spiritual Path
    visit my website at http://www.witchgrotto.com
    read my LiveJournal blog
    find me on Facebook

  • #2
    Probably Bobcat's Living Druidry. Although as a Druidic book it doesn't focus on classic Wiccan deities, it does certainly describe and discuss many of the spiritual practices and influences that are the foundation of my beliefs. There the Sacred is seen more as panentheistic and natural rather than archetypal or literal. Still the imagery and honesty, the way she describes the Divine and how to live it, are intensely magical to me. It's more a book of how to live within the Universe and how to sense & ride the energies within.

    Incidentally, her Druid Priestess follows seasonal themes and is more tuned to the Wiccan sabbats, but I haven't worked through it yet.
    Last edited by RainInanna; November 28th, 2008, 01:49 PM.
    Om Namah Shivaya.

    "Im finding seeking the sacred, well, that its rather like falling in love, the harder you seek it, the less likely it is to happen." - Brightshores

    "When your consciousness is directed outward, mind and world arise. When it is directed inward, it realizes its own Source and returns home into the Unmanifested." ~ Eckhart Tolle

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    • #3
      I'd say Scott Cunningham. His books were my introduction to Wicca, and really gave me a context into which I could better understand and organize my own beliefs and thoughts.

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      • #4
        Yeah, Scott Cunningham was very influential when I was first starting on the Wiccan Path. More recently I've read a couple by Raven Grimassi that were very good. Honestly, I haven't read that many books about Wicca. I get more from interaction and discussion, either in person or online.

        As far as fiction, I was really influenced by Mercedes Lackey many years ago although she's not Wiccan either, and in the last dozen years very much impacted by Terry Pratchett and his Pagan point of view.
        ____________
        If you make a customer happy, he'll tell 3 other people.
        If he's not happy, he'll tell 20 others.



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        • #5
          Probably Isaac Bonewits. He completely changed my way of thinking.
          ___________________________________________________



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          • #6
            I know, I know - I'm not Wiccan. Got my flame-retardant suit on.

            But I know of a **Wiccan author** who was just so awesome, I wanted to share. I really love her stuff, and if I ever considered going down the Wiccan path, she'd be one of my main guides.

            The book I read was called, The Circle Within, by Dianne Sylvan. It was basically about how to integrate your beliefs into a daily, momentary, permanent practice... creating a spirituality within your beliefs, not just going through the movements of ritual and the words of belief. She's funny, intelligent, spiritual... and really draws you in. It's kind of like a, "What to do AFTER Wicca 101."

            Even though I personally am not Wiccan, she is, and I turn to her book frequently when I'm looking to refresh my spiritual side. I'm thinking of getting her other book, The Body Sacred... still haven't read it! Maybe this Yule/Christmas.
            "The cosmos is also within us, we're made of star stuff.
            We are a way for the cosmos to know itself."

            Carl Sagan, as quoted by The Symphony of Science

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sequoia View Post
              I know, I know - I'm not Wiccan. Got my flame-retardant suit on.

              But I know of a **Wiccan author** who was just so awesome, I wanted to share. I really love her stuff, and if I ever considered going down the Wiccan path, she'd be one of my main guides.

              The book I read was called, The Circle Within, by Dianne Sylvan. It was basically about how to integrate your beliefs into a daily, momentary, permanent practice... creating a spirituality within your beliefs, not just going through the movements of ritual and the words of belief. She's funny, intelligent, spiritual... and really draws you in. It's kind of like a, "What to do AFTER Wicca 101."

              Even though I personally am not Wiccan, she is, and I turn to her book frequently when I'm looking to refresh my spiritual side. I'm thinking of getting her other book, The Body Sacred... still haven't read it! Maybe this Yule/Christmas.
              I have some friends who think that book is awesome. It's on my shelf now, waiting to be read.
              ____________
              If you make a customer happy, he'll tell 3 other people.
              If he's not happy, he'll tell 20 others.



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              • #8
                what author affected you

                There are 3 Dion Fortunes book the Sea Priestess and Moon magic, anything by Scott cunningham,and Stewart Farrar-

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sequoia View Post
                  I know, I know - I'm not Wiccan. Got my flame-retardant suit on.

                  But I know of a **Wiccan author** who was just so awesome, I wanted to share. I really love her stuff, and if I ever considered going down the Wiccan path, she'd be one of my main guides.

                  The book I read was called, The Circle Within, by Dianne Sylvan. It was basically about how to integrate your beliefs into a daily, momentary, permanent practice... creating a spirituality within your beliefs, not just going through the movements of ritual and the words of belief. She's funny, intelligent, spiritual... and really draws you in. It's kind of like a, "What to do AFTER Wicca 101."

                  Even though I personally am not Wiccan, she is, and I turn to her book frequently when I'm looking to refresh my spiritual side. I'm thinking of getting her other book, The Body Sacred... still haven't read it! Maybe this Yule/Christmas.

                  Indeed, she kicks major ass! If you are thinking of getting The Body Sacred, run, don't walk to the store and grab it. Great stuff!

                  I like Valiente, the Farrars, Sylvan, Cunningham, "A Witch's Guide to Life" by Kala Trobe, Amber K, and Starhawk. Some authors who do not necessarily call themselves Wiccan, but have surely influenced me are Grey Cat, Ann Moura, T.Thorne Coyle, and Z Budapest.--shuvanilu
                  Last edited by shuvanilu; November 29th, 2008, 02:28 PM.
                  "Calm down, Neddly diddily diddily diddily, doodily. They did their best shodaiddily iddily iddily diddily diddily. Gotta be nice, hostidididildilidilly ah HELL diddily ding dong crap! Can't you morons do anything RIGHT!?"---Ned Flanders

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                  • #10
                    Many books have affected me over the years, but for 'most profound' experience, the only candidate can be the book that convinced me that Wicca, as opposed to other pagan paths with which I was then connected, was for me.

                    That book is Stewart Farrar's "The Twelve Maidens", one of his pieces of fiction. I can even remember reading the first ten or so chapters on a train crossing Salisbury plain, spending the evening in Bath, failing to finish it on my way back and skipping morning lectures (I almost never did this) to finish it, rush to the uni library, finding the only 'factual' book they had and sitting in the bar reading that until lunchtime.

                    That second book was "What Witches Do", published, IIRC, the previous year, and in retrospect I do wonder why a large university library should have just that one volume, rather than several or none. Perhaps it was fate.

                    blessings
                    ffetcher

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                    • #11
                      I don't really consider myself wiccan although it is probably the biggest part of my path. I suppose Cunningham was the one that opened Wicca up to me and it was through reading his books that I got that 'coming home' feeling and a bit more self confident in my beliefs and practices. After that, Viviene Crowley was the biggest influence and in recent years I have become very fond of Kala Trobe.
                      😈 "It's too bad that stupidity isn't painful." Anton LaVey 😈

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                      • #12
                        Isobel Bird. Though her series came to an abrupt halt. i really like the idea of 3 teens who come from different cliques in their school are united by a simple shared interest in wicca. Just the adventures and discoveries they have along their path is believable and amazingly intriguing.
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cassie View Post
                          I don't really consider myself wiccan although it is probably the biggest part of my path. I suppose Cunningham was the one that opened Wicca up to me and it was through reading his books that I got that 'coming home' feeling and a bit more self confident in my beliefs and practices. After that, Viviene Crowley was the biggest influence and in recent years I have become very fond of Kala Trobe.

                          I would say Cunningham was a huge influence to me also. I know some people will scoff themselves to death, but Silver RavenWolf did educate me about a lot of things, even if it was re-examining what she elaborated on and finding the truth. Plus her systems of magic and circle casting are easily universal and adoptable.

                          Yasmine Galenorn's book Embracing the Moon(Every witch should have it) is not a Wiccan book per say, but it's magical practice and the style of it has certainly left a lasting impact on me.

                          Also, there were two individuals that had a website(The wife used to frequent the board), called Silverdove & Spiritwolf's lair. It was a Wiccan website LOADED with information. It had beautiful midi music on every single page, and I can't describe how serious I am when I say that they needed to close that site down, print it all out, and compile a book.

                          That being said they did actually close it down, mostly because their beliefs stayed in the Witch/Pagan/Wiccan area but moved from the Wicca they wrote about. Till this day I want to just holler at them for doing that. There was such a wealth of information on there that would have been helpful to so many people.

                          - Dumunzi

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dumunzi View Post
                            I know some people will scoff themselves to death, but Silver RavenWolf did educate me about a lot of things, even if it was re-examining what she elaborated on and finding the truth. Plus her systems of magic and circle casting are easily universal and adoptable.
                            Not everything she puts out is absolute garbage, of course. I can't think of an author, besides Stephanie Meyer (I'm talking authors in general) that have nothing good to bring to the table.

                            It's just...$RW's a presumptuous, commercialistic bitch that needs to shut her ****ing mouth once in a while. Because when she gets on a subject she knows nothing about, she drones on about as if she did, and all that spews out is bullshit.

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                            • #15
                              Though I am not Wiccan I too was "brought home" by Cunningham's wonderful works. At the tender age of 15ish I found Cunningham and he brought everything I'd been dabbling and playing with "unconsciously" into focus. His words gave me solace in knowing that I wasn't alone and there was guidance to be had. His works really opened my eyes and ears and then doors.

                              Wicca was a doorway for me so I don't deny it's roots in my beginnings.





                              "Keep away from small people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great." --Mark Twain


                              If having a deep disdain for entertaining the cerebrally challenged in politics makes one a bigot than the Queen Bigot am I. :crown:


                              If you search for the laws of harmony, you will find knowledge
                              ~temple wall in Luxor~




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