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what author affected your Wiccan beliefs/practices most profoundly?

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  • #91
    Well, Paul Huson influenced me hugely in terms of magic.

    Spiral Dance was my very first Wicca book, and I stole from it wholesale.

    Judy Harrow is someone I've been privileged to know and learn from, though that's her and not her books (though I find them very valuable).

    Robert Wang has also been a huge influence (again, not Wicca).

    I included sources that aren't particularly Wiccan because they influenced me, and I am. Hope that makes some kind of sense.
    Last edited by Cat; July 13th, 2009, 09:04 PM.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by Ben Gruagach View Post
      Here's an interesting question for the Wiccans on the board here.

      What author or book affected your Wiccan beliefs and/or practices the most profoundly? Why? Did the book just feel like it triggered an awakening for you, or did it perhaps bring out such strong disagreements in you that you were forced to examine your own beliefs and practices?
      Well, I wouldn't call it "Wicca" per se, but # 1 I'd have to say Starhawk's The Spiral Dance (TSD) also. I love her lucid writing, the poetry, etc. Of course, much of it is based on Victor Andersons' Feri Tradition (not counting the Charge, of course), and Starhawk says this in the book, yet TSD still bears Starhawk's unique stamp.

      I was also highly influenced by Sybil Leek's Complete Art of Witchcraft, Paul Huson's Mastering Witchcraft (one of my first Witchcraft books), and Ed Fitch's Pagan Way materials.
      Last edited by SoulFire; October 23rd, 2010, 08:50 PM.
      B*B,
      SoulFire

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      • #93
        Definitely Scott Cunningham. His books were the first I ever got. I always recommend them to those who are interested in Wicca because they are very insightful and offer suggestions while still allowing room for the practitioner to think for themselves.
        "From too much love of living,
        From hope and fear set free,
        We thank with brief thanksgiving
        Whatever gods may be
        That no life lives for ever;
        That dead men rise up never;
        That even the weariest river
        Winds somewhere safe to sea."

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        • #94
          That's a really interesting discussion...

          mainly because I find that the authors mentioned fall, on the whole, into two distinct categories;

          1) "Yeah right on!" Many of these are not by "Wiccan" authors, or even really about "Wicca" per se - which I think says something.

          2) "hug*ing hell you must be kidding"

          There isn't really much middle ground (or indeed very many new authors).

          I would like to toss some more names into the mix here though -
          1) Ursula Le Guin - for the Earthsea books - which made me a magician when I was about 8, and elements of which, to be perfectly honest, still resonate strongly with my practice!
          2) Jan Fries - the Germanic Genius who writes the only bullshit free books about magick and paganism - challenging, and subjective - always asking "this is what happens when I do x - what does it do for you?"
          3) Margot Adler - whose "Drawing down the moon" alerted me to the fact that I wasn't the only on, and that in fact there was a whole culture of people out there who took these things seriously.

          I think that there is also room for some mentioning some other good people - Austin Osman Spare, as well as some nutters (Into the Mauve Zone with Kenneth and Steffi anyone?). I would also recommend some publishers -
          Mandrake of Oxford,
          Anathema,
          Avalonia, Cappall Bann, and the utterly wonderful new Scarlet Imprint (not cheap - but lovely books)


          As for those mentioned whom others have mentioned above - I've got a real soft spot for Starhawk, as a creator of Modern Myths, and for Hutton for challenging the literal interpretation of same. I have a pretty low opinion of people who parade their silly celtic (or insert your chosen ethnicity) sounding names as a method of re-hashing some old ideas, and a lower one of people who invent "traditions" and give themselves imposing sounding titles.

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          • #95
            One of the autors who has affected me most was Vivianne Crowley. After her book, the most books wheren't interesting anymore. I didn't see her in the messages in this topic. In America her books aren't read much? She gave me more than others a starting point to explore things in mind. Wicca/Witchcraft is a way of thinking and a way to see the world different and she is explaining it well.

            Other very good books where IMHO Stewart Farrar (Witches Bible) or Marian Green. Marian Green gave me the idee to research my enviroment better. The idea from the Farrars about the Oak and Holly king, isn't however not my piece of cake. I couldn't fix it in my "basic pattern".

            There where some Dutch/Belgium autors affecting me too. The book of Walter van Coppenole was inspiring. It's called "from Monk to Witch"and containes his life story and path from monk to witch. On some Dutch fora you talk with him, he uses the computer althought he is very old. Another autor who was afected me where Melkor and Nimue. Hight Priestess Nimue writes al lot on Dutch forums under a different nickname. She triggers people on an cryptic way to explore more.
            Believe in a world of fairytales.... dreams may come true!

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            • #96
              Originally posted by Ben Gruagach View Post
              Here's an interesting question for the Wiccans on the board here.

              What author or book affected your Wiccan beliefs and/or practices the most profoundly? Why? Did the book just feel like it triggered an awakening for you, or did it perhaps bring out such strong disagreements in you that you were forced to examine your own beliefs and practices?
              For me it too was Starhawk's Spiral Dance and Margot Adler's Drawing down the Moon, oh and cant forget Farrar's Witches Bible. Now before the books came out I was into Green Egg Mag.


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              • #97
                Scott Cunningham, Margot Adler, and Raven Grimassi.

                Excellent authors.

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                • #98
                  Since the title of this thread is "what author affected your Wiccan beliefs/practices most profoundly?" and not which Wiccan Books or authors...
                  Sir James George Frazers book The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion, was the first that I read and is what initially led me to researching paganism in general, not just Wicca.

                  Other than that, Ive read all of Anton LaVeys books, which may sound crazy, but they even had some influence on my beliefs. Like a lot of people need ritual/religion in their life, but not a god or saviour , symbolism is a key part in ritual, not following the herd, but to do as we wish as long as we do not force our opinions on others, and other things.

                  I havent really read any other "pagan or wiccan" authors. I have read mainly stuff online and been influenced by some even on here.

                  A lot of great suggestions for books on this thread, that I need to check out though. Im waiting on A Witches Bible to arrive any time now.
                  Last edited by Kern; April 2nd, 2011, 10:15 AM.



                  "But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg."-Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, 1782

                  My Beliefs

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                  • #99
                    When I first came to Wicca, it was Scott Cunningham's book by that title that influenced me a lot. When I came back to the path in 2008, it was Phyllis Curott's book "Witchcrafting" and Diane Sylvin's "The Circle Within". But I've gathered way too many books to narrow my focus down to just one.
                    "All acts of love and pleasure are my rituals." -- Charge of the Goddess.

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                    • It was Jennifer Hunter's 21st Century Wicca that first turned me onto Paganism in general and Wicca in particular. I still love that book and reread it almost 20 years later.
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