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  • What drew you to Wicca?

    It seems that many people start their pagan path in Wicca, however it seems very few stick with Wicca. I am wondering what drew you to Wicca and why did you decide to stay? Why is Wicca right for you? What are you favorite and least favorite aspects of Wicca? Is Wicca as fluffy as some people seem to think or is there more to it?

    I know that last question may seem a bit rude, however I feel drawn to explore Wicca lately and thought what better place than MW? However if there are more resources which you know of I would love to see those as well. Not sure where to begin dividing the faux-Wicca from actual Wicca..if you know what I mean.

    I really like Anne Moura style Wicca if that helps to let people know where I'm coming from.

  • #2
    Thanks for asking this -- I'm feeling the same way and look forward to people's answers!
    little zombies by p. robertson
    i was by zetta

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    • #3
      Well....when I was growing up my sister and I had a friend who lived a couple houses down from us that's Wiccan. I always thought it was interesting because I grew up in a Christian household (please shoot me in the face:hahugh and that it was different. When I was about 8 years old, I knew I was different from everyone else at church but couldn't really pinpoint it. But then after awhile, it just went to the back burner, never really thought about it. But when my pastor died and my church started falling apart, that's when I pretty much had enough of the stupid descrepancies and shit in Christianity and felt pinned down by all of it. So late 2007, I asked my mom how she would felt if I changed my religion. She said as long as it wasn't voodoo or satanism, she didn't care. So, after I made a pact to myself that I was no longer going to be Christian and didn't care what people tried to throw at me, I felt this huge burden lift from my body. I guess maybe I was supposed to be pagan all along and didn't realize it til now. I may be confused a lot and not understand a lot, but it makes me feel better. Sorry for writing a book lol
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Sacredsin View Post
        It seems that many people start their pagan path in Wicca, however it seems very few stick with Wicca. I am wondering what drew you to Wicca and why did you decide to stay? Why is Wicca right for you? What are you favorite and least favorite aspects of Wicca? Is Wicca as fluffy as some people seem to think or is there more to it?

        I know that last question may seem a bit rude, however I feel drawn to explore Wicca lately and thought what better place than MW? However if there are more resources which you know of I would love to see those as well. Not sure where to begin dividing the faux-Wicca from actual Wicca..if you know what I mean.

        I really like Anne Moura style Wicca if that helps to let people know where I'm coming from.
        I think maybe when seekers don't realize there is more to Wicca than the fluffy-light-love stuff, that's when they don't stay with it. There's not enough meat to that Wiccan-esque stuff to keep it meaningful.

        I was lucky that I had a good teacher who started with lessons about ethics and went on to teaching us how to use energy and do magic responsibly instead of feeding us a bunch of crap about how we wouldn't be ready to do magic for a long time, and would have to be so very-very careful so it didn't backfire on us. Magic doesn't backfire - it simply does what we ask, so we have to be very clear what we're asking for, and we have to be willing to accept whatever fallout or consequences there are.

        For those who are interested in learning about Wicca, I think we've had some information (maybe in the book section) about which authors are most helpful and which are most confusing or full of crap. If you can find a teaching group or a mentor (witchvox is a good source but use some common sense and don't stay with a teacher who insists they know it all and must never be questioned), well for me that has always been my preferred way of learning.
        ____________
        If you make a customer happy, he'll tell 3 other people.
        If he's not happy, he'll tell 20 others.



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        • #5
          Not Wiccan, but, started out that way, so, I figured I could post too, but, what due me to Wicca was, well, Charmed, I started out watching it, then joined this Charmed forum, and there was a Wiccan section there, where real Wiccans hung out, I started to ask questions there, read the links and FAQ they had, and things progressed from there, really, though, I was a pretty much 1/2 assed Wiccan, I only did one, or maybe more, rituals for the Sabbats, always telling myself, I'd do a proper ritual for the next, it never happened, eventually, I realised it wasn't for me, and moved on to just being a general Pagan, and I realised I was more interested in magic, than the religion. Right now, I'd guess I'd define myself as Spiritual, without any specific religion, I like learning about different belierfs, but, so far, I haven't connected to any specific one.

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          • #6
            I'm just starting out, and what really draws me in is the rituals and things. Casting of the Circle is one of my favs. I had looked at Wicca when i was must have been 14ish. But I could never find anything other than the love spells, or anyone to hep me understand Wicca. I was at a loss. So i gave up. Since then i've been looking all over, switching between budism, druidism and what not. But once again im back to wicca and hope to have a menotor or teacher of somekind. Or even just someone I can go to to ask for help.
            "Take that next step Daughter, I am forever beside you" - Mother Earth

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kaii View Post
              I'm just starting out, and what really draws me in is the rituals and things. Casting of the Circle is one of my favs. I had looked at Wicca when i was must have been 14ish. But I could never find anything other than the love spells, or anyone to hep me understand Wicca. I was at a loss. So i gave up. Since then i've been looking all over, switching between budism, druidism and what not. But once again im back to wicca and hope to have a menotor or teacher of somekind. Or even just someone I can go to to ask for help.
              Hello Kaii, welcome to the Wicca forum here at MW.

              Have you looked for local groups or teachers/mentors through witchvox? There are several listings for your area. Click here
              ____________
              If you make a customer happy, he'll tell 3 other people.
              If he's not happy, he'll tell 20 others.



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              • #8
                I always been fasinated by the topic..

                and once I actually read a book about Paganism , I felt drawn like I was being called to it ..and i felt more at ease with myself as i kept reading the book..

                in someway it called to me ...like my soul was being pulled into it.

                its hard to explain..but ever since that first book..I felt it was right for me.

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                • #9
                  I grew up on a farm and felt drawn to Wicca because of the emphasis on reverence for Mother Earth and the Horned God (about as wild as you can get for deities!) It was also attractive to me because what I had read (things like Sybil Leek's "Complete Art of Witchcraft") were very inclusive towards gays and lesbians -- which was very encouraging to me since I'm gay.

                  I started my studies, as a solitary, when I was about 14. I didn't start working with others until I was at university and living away from my parents. (Edited to add: and I'm in my 40s now and still proudly Wiccan!)

                  Wicca is very much a religion for self-starters: you get out of it directly in proportion to the effort you put into it. People who like to just do what they are told tend to not do so well unless they happen to find a coven that will dictate to them (they exist, but are counterbalanced by the huge number of solitaries out there who are fiercely independent-minded.)

                  Every religion has people who are more "into it" than others. I'm of the opinion that it's a bit pointless worrying about who is more involved than others. It's like being "witchier than thou" is something to strive towards -- why?

                  There are books, teachers, and groups that speak to such a wide variety of levels of interest and involvement that there will be something out there for most everyone who wants to learn more about Wicca. That's a good thing. We should encourage people to find their comfort level, learn, and then push to expand their knowledge and practice. If you find information that you disagree with, share your point of view and explain why you disagree. That's how we can all learn and hopefully improve and make Wicca as a whole a better thing.

                  Ben Gruagach
                  MysticWicks forum guide in "Paths: Wicca", "Books" and "History"
                  author of The Wiccan Mystic: Exploring a Magickal Spiritual Path
                  visit my website at http://www.witchgrotto.com
                  read my LiveJournal blog
                  find me on Facebook

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ben Gruagach View Post
                    "witchier than thou"
                    Yep, don't we all know at least one of those.

                    I looked up Wicca on the internet several years ago, thinking to find a bunch of weird outlandish stuff...only to be pleasantly surprised that it's a Nature-based, loving religion that accepts all walks of life.

                    I was hooked from there, and now it's some 10 years later. I have dabbled into many other religions during that time but have always come back.

                    So here I am.

                    sigpic



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                    • #11
                      to tell ya the truth?

                      Very early on in my life, I realized I have a very strong bond with nature and the elements. The moon allways fascinated me and my parents were very down to earth people who loved to hike and explore and loved every thing that was alive. My mother and sister were both dabbling a bit in it when I was younger and I would usually read the books they had laying around.

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                      • #12
                        I don't identify as Wiccan anymore, but it was the first Pagan religion that I practiced.

                        When I was a child, I always thought the idea of religion centered on humans based on a book written by people was strange and misguided. I saw nature as the real manifestation of divinity, and I also believed in spirits that inhabited the natural world. Whenever I would go into the country in the summer with my family, I liked wandering through the forests and sitting on the rocks by the lakes. On cloudy days I prayed to the sun to shine and make it warm so I could go to the beach. I didn't have a real "theology" or specific deity that I honored, I just viewed the natural world as conscious and spiritually animated.

                        I was a hardcore atheist in my adolescence, rebelling against the Abrahamic traditions, which I viewed to be false. One time I heard the word "Wicca" on TV, and looked it up in the dictionary, which defined it as a "nature religion." It seemed in tune with what I believed as a child, so I bought Scott Cunningham's book for the solitary practitioner, and it felt like I had found something authentic. I loved the idea of a Mother Goddess as the creatrix/destroyer of the universe, and the balance between male and female regarding divinity. I also liked that it values life and is inspired by the natural world rather than on a book of rules and dogma written by humans.

                        I still think it's a wonderful and valid religion, but it was too ceremonial for me, and I found the male/female duality of Wiccan divinity very limiting. I like the polytheism of Greek religion, the gender-fluidity of Feri, and the shamanic practices of the Witchcraft in Starhawk's The Spiral Dance (which is Feri-influenced). I don't think there is anything wrong with Wicca, but it's structure was not for me, although what I do can be considered related to Wicca in some ways.

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                        • #13
                          I think I have always been Wiccan and just didn't know there was a name for it!

                          I was raised Catholic and went to Catholic schools, though my family were never strict about it. I remember starting to question the religion in primary school and people got tetchy about it. So I just quietly decided I didn't believe in it anymore. This must have been aged 9 or 10. Went on to Catholic high school and went through the motions of mass etc when I had to, but it felt empty to me. I felt more divinity, power and peace sitting out under the moon and stars at night, or walking along the seashore listening to the waves, or walking through woodland. Those are the times I really felt close to the divine.

                          I would quietly observe the seasons changing and be in awe. Nobody I knew shared these views though.

                          I was browsing some books in my local new age shop one day at the age of about 14 (I used to go in there, buy insence and try to save my pocket money for the beautiful crystals they had) and I came across a little book by Kate West. I remember flicking through the pages thinking 'hang on, this is what i've been saying for years!'. Luckily I had enough money so I bought the book and read it on the bus on the way home. It felt like I had come home, all these years of believing and feeling something nobody else seemed to understand and I had discovered it was a real thing, with a name, and now nobody could take it away from me.

                          I did more research from there and spoke to my Mum about it. She didn't mind. But, exams loomed and Wicca was left on the back burner. Then at age 17 when I met my (now ex) fiance, he thought I was nuts and I (stupidly) got rid of all my books. It was only when I split with him after 3 years and met my new partner, I was comfortable enough to get back into Wicca.

                          So now here I am, I'm 22 and have been a proud practicing Wiccan for about a year now. I'm very excited about my path. :-)

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