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Tarot Study: The Hierophant

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  • #16
    Originally posted by AquariusWolf
    I relate this card to a person seeking spiritual guidance. In the RW deck, the Hierophant is shown with two young children; and rather than facing the Hierophant, they are praying together, towards each other. Also in this card, you can see carvings of a male and female face, as well as sheep and workers. What do these carvings signify? Anyone?
    What card are you using? I can't see the carvings from your thumbnail.


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    • #17
      Originally posted by Gigi
      What card are you using? I can't see the carvings from your thumbnail.

      Robin Wood - I realize the carvings are hard to see Do you have the deck?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by AquariusWolf
        Robin Wood - I realize the carvings are hard to see Do you have the deck?
        nope :-(

        I only have Universal Waite, The Medieval Scapini Tarot, and I just bought the Celtic Dragon. I'm not allowed to buy anymore for at least a month lol

        I also have "Healing w/ the Angels" Oracle cards.

        I'm going to look your card up on the Internet and see if I get a good look at that carving. I'll let you know if I find it.

        Gigi


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        • #19
          Couldn't find a good pic on Robin Hood. :-I


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          • #20
            I just bought the Celtic Dragon
            Cool! You can help me brainstorm.


            My Blog: The Musings of Faery-Wings

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Gigi
              Couldn't find a good pic on Robin Hood. :-I
              I'll try scanning the card tonight :D

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              • #22
                Originally posted by chryssi1
                Cool! You can help me brainstorm.
                Chryssi1, Anytime, you were the one that got me into "I gotta have the Celtric Dragon..." lol

                I cleansed it already, and I will be reviewing each card tonight to start getting a feel for them. But since I'm a newbie, I will be learning from the Universal Waite, and referring to these cards when participating in class.

                Maybe I'll pester you with questions, I hope you don't mind!


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                • #23
                  Originally posted by AquariusWolf
                  I'll try scanning the card tonight :D
                  Thanks! I'm still looking for the card. I can't stand myself when I just can't give up on something. lol


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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by AquariusWolf
                    I'll try scanning the card tonight :D
                    Any luck with scanning the card?

                    :-)

                    Gigi


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                    • #25
                      In my deck The Hierophant has been renamed as the High Priest, which is a small preference of mine in tarot decks. This card evokes a sense of spiritual attainment, individuality, and personal enlightenment.

                      The High Priest, much like the High Priestess, is in the later stages of his life, what I refer to as the Sage stage of the male cycle. He is outfitted in a white shirt with gold and green edging of what appear to be leaves, that in turn signify (spiritual) growth. His pants, much like his shirt is simplistic, and his blue cloak with purple lining flows freely. His outfit overall represents a certain amount of rebellion and humbleness in that he does not need to adorn himself with lavish robes to affirm his own spirituality and wisdom. The colors reflect purity (white), wisdom and contentment (blue), and spirituality (purple).

                      His hair is short and white, while his face appears to be in a state of contemplation, as if he is trying to figure the 'reader' out. He wears a simplistic circlet, which only reinforces my feelings of him finding it unnecessary to demonstrate himself through his attire.

                      In his right hand he holds a small wand, symbolic of his willpower and a sceptar tipped with a silver dragon in his right hand, with silver metalwork wrapping around the sceptar all the way down, symbollic of his spirituality and how all things are connected in my eyes.

                      Behind him is an extravagant tapestry full of celtic designs and various dragon images. The edging is a deep blue, signifying spirituality, and in the middle red, signifying willpower. Two dragons are the focus of the tapestry in the center of the red portion, one black, one white, that in turn signify to me how all things are interwoven, one relying on the other, and of balance.

                      Key words & phrases I associate with the High Priest:

                      Spirituality
                      Cause & effect (karma to some people)
                      Connection amongst all things
                      Individuality
                      Self-confidence
                      Education
                      Conscience
                      Conformity
                      Losing yourself
                      Restricted by dogma
                      Afraid to embrace your identity
                      Compensating for what you don't have
                      Willpower

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                      • #26
                        The Hierophant

                        I was so excited by all the stuff that came out of my research of this card that I guess I got carried away. However, I guess I think it might be interesting for those that are into symbolism, but it also helps you read the cards as well. Forgive the great length of this. This is specific to the RW tarot.

                        The Hierophant

                        Symbolism

                        Flowered Robes.

                        The acolytes in front of the Hierophant are wearing two different types of robes. The both have flowers on them and I thought it would be interesting to see what the symbolism of the flowers is.

                        White Lily—Majesty and Purity, Virginity


                        Red Rose--Love, Desire, Respect, Courage, Job well done, Love, Desire, Respect, Courage, Job well done, Unity/Flower Emblem of England, LOVE, I Love You, Passion

                        (lily=thought...rose=desire) or put more simply...the balance of the head and the heart. I have also heard that the red rose is the blood/body/physical self, and that the white lily is the pure/soul/astral self. Another meaning is that the lily is creative thought and inspiration and that the rose is manifestation; the ideas behind creative visualization.

                        The most obvious pairing of these flowers is on the Magician card, and Waite describes them in the PKT;

                        "...Beneath are roses and lilies, the flos campi and lilium convallium, changed into garden flowers, to shew the culture of aspiration..."

                        "Flos campi and lilium convallium" would seem to come from a verse in Song of Songs in the Vulgate Bible. The KJV translation of this verse is;

                        "I am the rose of Sharon, and the lily of the valleys."

                        A secular reading of this part of the Bible might conclude that it is nothing more than a poem of love, as indeed it is, but Christians attach some important symbolism to the story.

                        Sometimes Christians refer to Christ as the Rose of Sharon, and Lily of the Valleys, and also believe that the love affair in Song of Songs equates with Jesus' love for, and marriage to, the Church.

                        http://www.prs.org/gallery-rosicr.htm

                        This symbol represents Christ on the Cross.

                        There is also another layer of symbolism between the rose and the lily, in that a rose has five petals and a lily has six. These numbers represent the pentagram and hexagram, the microcosm and macrocosm, or for those more Qabalistically inclined, the Microprosopus and Macroprosopus.

                        In short "As above, so below"


                        Esotericism-The hand gesture

                        With his right hand he gives the well-known ecclesiastical sign which is called that of esotericism, distinguishing between the manifest and concealed part of doctrine. What is esotericism? The word 'esoteric' simply means that which is inner, contrasted with that which is outer or 'exoteric'. Esotericism is therefore the body of knowledge or wisdom about all aspects of life, which are within, behind, or beyond the outer appearance, form, or expression of life's many aspects.

                        Crosier (Or Pastoral Staff).

                        I got curious about the Crosier and found the following in the Catholic Encyclopedia (a great source book on line) It is interesting to note that the Pope hasn't carried one of those since 1250CE or some such.

                        According to present-day usage the Roman pontiff does not use the crosier.

                        Symbolism
                        The crosier is symbol of authority and jurisdiction. This idea is clearly expressed in the words of the Roman Pontifical with which the staff is presented to the bishop elect: "Accipe baculum pastoralis officii; et sis in corrigendis vitiis pie s viens, judicium sine irâ tenens, in fovendis virtutibus auditorum animos mulcens, in tranquillitate severitatis censuram non deserens" (Pont. Rom. 77). It is then, as Durandus (Rationale Divin. Off., III, xv) says, borne by prelates to signify their authority to correct vices, stimulate piety, administer punishment, and thus rule and govern with a gentleness that is tempered with severity. The same author goes on to say that, as the rod of Moses was the seal and emblem of his Divine commission as well as the instrument of the miracles he wrought, so is the episcopal staff the symbol of that doctrinal and disciplinary power of bishops in virtue of which they may sustain the weak and faltering, confirm the wavering in faith, and lead back the erring ones into the true fold. The evolution of the staff is of interest. Ecclesiologists distinguish three early forms. The first was a rod of wood bent or crooked at the top and pointed at the lower end. This is the oldest form and was known as the pedum. The second had, instead of the crook, a knob which was often surmounted by a cross, and was called the ferula or cambuta. It was sometimes borne by popes. In the third form the top consisted of a crux decussata, or Greek T, the arms of the cross being often so twisted as to represent two serpents opposed. This, known as the crocia, was borne by abbots and bishops of the Eastern Rite. The original material was generally cypress-wood, often cased or inlaid with gold or silver. Later on the staffs were made of solid ivory, gold, silver, and enamelled metal.

                        http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04515c.htm

                        The Power of the Keys

                        Matthew 16:17-19--Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: because flesh and blood hath not revealed it to thee, but my Father who is in heaven. And I say to thee: That thou art Peter; and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven

                        In all countries the key is the symbol of authority. Thus, Christ's words are a promise that He will confer on Peter supreme power to govern the Church. Peter is to be His vicegerent, to rule in His place. Further the character and extent of the power thus bestowed are indicated. It is a power to "bind" and to "loose" -- words which, as is shown below, denote the grant of legislative and judicial authority. And this power is granted in its fullest measure. Whatever Peter binds or looses on earth, his act will receive the Divine ratification. The meaning of this passage does not seem to have been challenged by any writer until the rise of the sixteenth-century heresies.

                        http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08631b.htm

                        The Tiara

                        The tiara is a non-liturgical ornament, which, therefore, is only worn for non-liturgical ceremonies, ceremonial procession to church and back, ceremonial papal processions, such as took place upon stated occasions until Rome was occupied by the Piedmontese, and at solemn acts of jurisdiction, as, for example, solemn dogmatic decisions.

                        http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14714c.htm

                        The tiara also seems to have the Hebrew letter for shin on top of it . The name JESUS is spelled by the Hebrew letters JHSVH – Yod , He , Shin , Vau , Heh .
                        The name is identical to that of Jehovah except for the added letter Shin in the middle.
                        What does Shin do to the name that graphically shows it to be the mediator between man and God? This alone confirms that the top of the tiara does in fact contain the letter Shin.

                        I haven't decided what this card means in a reading. I'm still trying to get all the symbolism straight, and then will work on the meaning for me.

                        Shatril
                        Last edited by Shatril; March 8th, 2007, 05:51 PM.

                        Ask, believe, receive. Thoughts become things!
                        I've made it a point not to regret anything I've done, there is no point in it because you can't change it~~RunningRiot
                        democracy is a failed system, people are just too stupid to realise their votes never matter anymore~~Valnorran

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